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Home > News > Geyman’s published senior thesis research offers new thoughts on how carbonates record global carbon cycle

Geyman’s published senior thesis research offers new thoughts on how carbonates record global carbon cycle

November 8th, 2019

“You can learn a lot from carbonates,” said Emily Geyman, a 2019 Princeton graduate in geosciences and the lead author of a paper published Nov. 8 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS). The paper was the result of Geyman’s senior thesis research in which she investigated the chemical composition of carbonates and how these carbonates record the carbon cycle.

Geyman’s research was predominantly funded by the PEI Environmental Scholars Program, which was established with a gift from Elizabeth A. Smith and Ray E. Newton III ’86. She initially received the 2017 award, and had an extension in 2018.

Geyman currently is pursuing a master’s with a focus on glaciology at the University of Tromsø in Arctic Norway as part of a Sachs Global Fellowship from Princeton.

She conducted her Bahamas work as part of her junior and senior independent work at Princeton. An accomplished young scientist, she has already been the recipient of numerous awards and accolades. She received the Peter W. Stroh ’51 Environmental Senior Thesis Prize, the Calvin Dodd MacCracken Award from Princeton’s School of Engineering and Applied Science and the Edward Sampson 1914 Award for distinguished work in environmental geoscience.

 

Read more on Geyman's research here.

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