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March 3rd, 2017

 

It's that time of year again, when seniors withdraw into the depths of libraries and their dorm rooms to complete perhaps the most exhaustive and nuanced endeavor that they will undertake during their Princeton careers: the senior thesis. For months, these students have been conducting research, building, performing, interviewing, and writing these capstone projects that are often mysteries to underclassmen. To get an idea of what these students have been spending hours and hours on, the Street interviewed three seniors, Dylan Blau Edelstein ’17, former Street editor Harrison Blackman ’17, and Daniel Teehan ’17. All of the seniors are AB students; Edelstein is concentrating in Spanish & Portuguese, Blackman in History, and Teehan in Comparative Literature.

The Daily Princetonian: If you could pitch your thesis, how would you describe it?

 

Dylan Blau Edelstein: My thesis is about the legacy of Nise da Silveira, a pioneering art therapist and psychiatrist in Brazil during the 1940’s. At a time when people were turning to lobotomy and electroshock therapy, she led painting workshops at a mental hospital for her patients, whom she referred to as “clients.” Many of them hadn’t spoken in years, and were deemed lost causes by the institution. But in these workshops, the clients not only gained access to language through images, but also went on to become some of the most famous painters in Brazil at that time.
Silveira died in 1999, so for my research last summer I interviewed people who knew her, and visited sites of various projects she started. Through that process, I am envisioning my thesis as a sort of collective memory. I wanted to look at what we can learn from her, what she means for a country like Brazil that was a pioneer in the anti-asylum movement, and what it means to humanize people who have been locked up for years in a hospital. Silveira published a number of books that were never translated into English, so I also saw this as an opportunity to create some English scholarship about her.
 
Read about more interviews here.
March 1st, 2017

 

Sophomore Naoum Fares Marayati is taking in as much of his Princeton experience as he can. When Marayati is not studying for his next class, you may find him guiding a tour in the Princeton University Art Museum, tutoring at the McGraw Center for Teaching and Learning, singing with the Umqombothi a cappella group or hosting a study break at Forbes College, his favorite community on campus.

The psychology major from Aleppo, Syria, and North Carolina attributes his growth on campus to a value Princeton has taught him: to be in the service of humanity. Marayati plans to take this value into the future as he hopes to become a neurosurgeon.

Read more about this story here.

February 28th, 2017

 

As part of Princeton University's ongoing efforts to increase diversity and inclusion, three academic departments have created pilot programs that build bridges between undergraduate coursework and doctoral programs for promising young scholars from underrepresented backgrounds.  

Read more about this story here.

February 28th, 2017
Photo of Heather Gerken

 

Heather Gerken ’91 has been selected as the next dean of Yale Law School, Yale University President Peter Salovey announced Feb. 21. Gerken will be the first woman to hold this position.

Gerken is a renowned professor who has taught at both Harvard and Yale, in addition to clerking for Justice David Souter of the United States Supreme Court and practicing law herself. She is also one of the country’s most prominent experts in the fields of constitutional and election law. Her academic work focuses on federalism and diversity.

Read more about this story here.

February 16th, 2017
Gold and Salazar Pyne Prize Winners-Seniors

 

Seniors Solveig Gold and Marisa Salazar have been named co-winners of the University's 2017 Moses Taylor Pyne Honor Prize, the highest general distinction conferred on an undergraduate.

The Pyne Honor Prize, established in 1921, is awarded to the senior who has most clearly manifested excellent scholarship, strength of character and effective leadership. Previous recipients include the late Princeton President Emeritus Robert F. Goheen, former U.S. Sen. Paul Sarbanes and U.S. Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor.

They will be recognized at a luncheon during Alumni Day on campus Saturday, Feb. 25.

You can read more about this story here.

 

February 16th, 2017
University of Cambridge Photo

 

Seniors Penina Krieger, Natasha Turkmani and Charlotte Williams, as well as Class of 2013 graduate Erica Cao, have been awarded Gates Cambridge Scholarships. The awards give outstanding students from outside the United Kingdom the opportunity to pursue postgraduate study at the University of Cambridge. The program was established in 2000 by a donation from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation to Cambridge to build a global network of future leaders committed to improving the lives of others.

Read more about this story here.

February 6th, 2017
Photo for Stanford SRC conference

 

On behalf of the Stanford Undergraduate Research Association (SURA), we encourage you to apply to the 2017 Stanford Research Conference (SRC 2017)! Held from April 14 through April 16 on the campus of Stanford University, SRC 2017 is our third annual national undergraduate research conference. At the conference, you'll interact with esteemed Stanford faculty members in workshops, receive feedback in a poster symposium, learn about cutting-edge research, and explore the Bay Area. Past speakers have included Nobel laureates, domain experts, and renowned faculty.

 We encourage students involved in academic research in all disciplines to apply! Past participants have presented research completed through summer research programs, senior thesis projects, and other work guided by faculty at their home institutions.

 Apply by the deadline, February 17, 2017. 

Questions? Contact board.sura@gmail.com.

 

February 6th, 2017
Photo for the Scholars in the Nation Initiative

 

Ten students at Princeton have been selected to the 2017 cohort of the Scholars in the Nation’s Service Initiative (SINSI)! Established in 2006, SINSI is designed to encourage, support and prepare the nation’s top students to pursue careers in the U.S. federal government, in both international and domestic agencies.

Established in 2006, SINSI is designed to encourage, support and prepare the nation’s top students to pursue careers in the U.S. federal government, in both international and domestic agencies. Through rigorous academic training integrated with work experience, the goal of the highly competitive scholarship program is to provide students with the language and workplace skills needed to succeed in the public policy arena.

You can read more about this story here.

 

January 30th, 2017

 

Now on the Department of Chemistry website: Four Princeton researchers discuss the motivations and inspirations behind their recent co-authored review article on using biology to solve sustainable energy problems. Participants in the conversation include BWF Fellow Buz Barstow, CBE assistant professor Jose Avalos, Barstow lab technician Oluwakemi Adesina and undergraduate Isao Anzai ‘17.


Read more about this story here.

January 30th, 2017
Building Bridges Photo

 

The Largest Student-Run Conference on Educational Research - Come Join!

The 22nd annual Student Research Conference (SRC), taking place on Friday, April 7 at the Harvard

Graduate School of Education, seeks to foster a dialogue on how educational research can serve as a

tool to bring people from different backgrounds together to advance educational outcomes. This year's

conference theme is "Spanning the Divide: Building Bridges through Research.

To submit a proposal to the conference, please visit here. Proposals are due no later than Friday, February 17th.

The registration form can be found here.

More information can be found on the Harvard Graduate School website.

If you have any questions or concerns, please contact the SRC Team at HarvardSRC2017@gmail.com.

 

 

 

 

 

 

January 23rd, 2017

 

A regional APS Conference for Undergraduate Women in Physics was held on campus and at PPPL the weekend of Jan. 13-15, bringing together more than 200 undergraduate women interested in physics and careers in the field. Urry, a professor of astrophysics at Yale whose research focuses on active galaxies that host supermassive black holes in their centers, was one of the plenary speakers at the conference, which focused on giving young women the tools to stay in physics and other STEM fields. More than 200 women attended the event.

You can read more about this story here.

January 23rd, 2017

 

In the "The Science of Mythbusters," Professor Joshua Shaevitz and 15 students are examining how scientific research is done, from identifying real-world problems and getting funding to creating experiments and analyzing evidence. Influenced by the popular cable TV show, this freshman seminar focuses on the ways in which scientists approach real-world problems using the scientific method. Working within the framework of skeptical inquiry, the 15 students in the class engage in discussion and analysis on the practices of science, including how experiments are designed, the continuous cycle of hypothesis and testing, and the imaginative solutions that are developed for practical situations.

You can read more on this story here.

It is also available on our YouTube channel:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t3B_oF9iSG4

 

 

 

 

January 20th, 2017
Sigma Xi Student Research Day

 

Each spring, the Thomas Jefferson University Chapter of Sigma Xi organizes a Student Research Day. The main focus of this day is poster presentations by undergraduate, graduate and medical students. The poster session offers students the opportunity to interact with colleagues and faculty, to win prizes, to catch up on current scientific discoveries, to learn about new areas of research, and to practice networking and scientific presentation skills.

This year the TJU Student Research Day will be held on Wednesday, March 22nd, 2017.

Princeton undergraduate students are encouraged to submit posters of their research. 
Click here to submit an abstract

Poster presentations will be judged by TJU scientists and cash prizes will be awarded for the best poster in each research category, including the undergraduate student category.
 
Undergraduate students and advisers will also have the opportunity to attend an information session with the Jefferson College of Biomedical Sciences Admissions to discuss learn more about graduate education at Jefferson.

The poster session will be followed by the annual William Potter Lecture at 4:00 pm. We are excited to announce that the 2017 Potter Lecture will be given by Arthur Lander, MD, PhD, Donald Bren Professor of Developmental and Cell Biology at the University of California, Irvine, and Director of the Center for Complex Biological Systems, an NIGMS National Center for Systems Biology.   Students and their advisers are cordially invited to the reception at the conclusion of the awards ceremony.

Key dates:

  • Abstract submission OPENS - Friday, January 13th, 2017
  • Abstract submission DEADLINE - Tuesday, February 21st, 2017
  • Acceptance notification - Thursday, March 2nd, 2017
  • Research Day - Wednesday, March 22nd, 2017

Please note: we can accommodate up to 130 posters, so submit early while space is available!

If you have questions about the event, please contact me by email: carol.beck@jefferson.edu


 

 

December 12th, 2016
Sachs Scholarship photo

 

Princeton seniors Becca Keener and Shannon Osaka have received Sachs Scholarships, one of the highest awards given to undergraduates at the University. The scholarship is intended to enlarge each recipient’s experience of the world by providing the opportunity to study, work or travel abroad after graduation. Keener will pursue a master’s degree focusing on global Europe: culture and conflict at the London School of Economics. Osaka will  study for a master’s in nature, society and environmental governance at Worcester College, Oxford. 

For the first time this year, a Sachs Scholarship is being given for one year of study at Princeton. The award goes to Holly Muir, who graduated from Oxford in June. She will come to Princeton as a visiting student in the Graduate School, and will pursue study in the English department and the creative writing program. 

Read more about this story here.

 

December 12th, 2016
Joani Etskovitz photo

 

Princeton senior Joani Etskovitz has been named a 2017 Marshall Scholar. The Marshall Scholarship covers the cost of graduate study and living at a British university of the recipient's choice for up to two years. Marshall Scholarships help build strong ties with the United states by giving young Americans of high ability and leadership potential the opportunity to study at universities in the United Kingdom. In 2017, 40 students will join the program, an increase from the 32 places originally planned for the year.

Etskovitz, who is from Wayne, Pennsylvania, is an English major who is pursuing certificates in humanistic studies and European cultural studies.

 

Read more about this story here.

December 5th, 2016

 

Princeton University senior Ellie Sell has been named a George J. Mitchell Scholar to study gender, sexuality and culture at University College Dublin. Twelve Mitchell Scholarships were awarded to students nationwide by the nonprofit U.S.-Ireland Alliance based in Washington, D.C. 

A native of Tallahassee, Florida, Sell is a chemistry major who plans to pursue a medical degree. Sell hopes to use the time in Ireland to build an academic foundation in gender studies and queer theory that will be valuable as a physician and researcher.

"These fields have been and will continue to be invaluably important to the continued evolution of medicine in the United States," Sell said. "I hope to investigate the ways in which gender as a social construction shapes forces that influence not only patient outcomes but also how patients move through the health-care system. Having a background in gender, sexuality and culture will allow me to bring gender studies and queer theory into my medical career and future academic research."

You can read more about this story here.

December 5th, 2016

 

Princeton seniors Jacob Cannon, Preston Lim, Samuel Maron, Emery Real Bird, Molly Reiner and Kevin Wong have been named Schwarzman Scholars. The Schwarzman Scholarship covers the cost of graduate study and living toward a one-year master's program at Tsinghua University in Beijing. 

For its second class, 129 scholars were selected from around the world. The scholars will study economics and business, international studies, and public policy. The courses will be taught in English by professors from Tsinghua as well as visiting scholars and will start in August. Cultural immersion and travel also are key elements of the scholarship. Blackstone investment firm co-founder Stephen Schwarzman founded the scholarship program, and the scholars will be housed on the Schwarzman College on the Tsinghua campus.

You can read more about this story here.

December 1st, 2016
PRD logo square

 

Applications are being accepted for presenters at the 2017 Princeton Research Day, the second annual campus-wide celebration of research and creative endeavors by the University's undergraduates, graduate students, postdoctoral researchers and other nonfaculty researchers.

The May 11, 2017, event offers an opportunity for student and early career researchers and artists to share their work with the community through talks, posters, performances, art exhibitions, demonstrations and digital presentations. Topics will represent the range of research across the University, including the natural sciences, social sciences, engineering, the arts and humanities.

The event, to be held in Frist Campus Center, will be free and open to the public and will conclude with an awards ceremony for outstanding contributions.

The 2017 edition of Princeton Research Day will feature a full day of events, building on the success of the inaugural Princeton Research Day in May 2016 that drew more than 130 presenters and hundreds of audience members, filling Frist with the sights and sounds of researchers and artists sharing their work.

Read the full story here.

December 1st, 2016
Strategic Partnership Photo

 

One of the cornerstones of Princeton's focus on international research and learning has been its strategic partnerships with universities in Germany, Japan and Brazil. The partnerships with Humboldt University, University of Tokyo and University of São Paulo were established four years ago as part of Princeton's ongoing internationalization efforts.

During this time, 48 collaborative academic projects have already received support through Princeton's respective partnerships with the three universities. The University continues to support new projects with these partners abroad, with the most recent calls for proposals from faculty issued this week. The partnerships are among Princeton's many international programs and connections with universities around the world that include study abroad programs, faculty fellowships, research collaborations and global scholars networks.

You can read more about this story here.

 

November 17th, 2016
Summer research photo

 

From improving the performance of solar cells to genetically engineering yeast to make biofuels, eight undergraduates at Princeton University engaged in exciting energy- and environment-related research projects this past summer through the University’s Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment. The students, who worked for eight weeks under the guidance of Andlinger Center faculty members, received funding for their projects through the Peter B. Lewis Fund for Student Innovation in Energy and the Environment and the Dede T. Bartlett P03 Fund for Student Research in Energy and the Environment.

You can read more this story here.

November 17th, 2016
Andlinger Center Photo

 

The Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment at Princeton University awards seed funding to catalyze and support projects proposed by University faculty, researchers, and students that are aimed at solving a broad range of energy and environmental problems. These projects foster innovative research, teaching, and mentorship in energy and the environment.

 Three new research projects were supported in 2015-2016, bringing the total number of projects supported since the inception of this initiative in 2011 to 35 and a total of $2.8 million invested.

You can read more about this story here.

 

November 15th, 2016
Cuban Consumerism

 

DENNISSE CALLE FOUND THE TOPIC for her senior thesis along a Havana street in the back of a stall that sells pirated movies and music.

Cubans pay the equivalent of a few dollars, insert a flash drive into the computer at the back of the stall, and get access to El Paquete — a weekly, one-terabyte compilation of popular TV shows, movies, music, computer and phone apps, and advertisements that serves as an offline Netflix, YouTube, Craigslist and more in a country where internet access is slow and expensive.  Calle, a sociology major at Princeton, spent two weeks in January doing research in Cuba and interviewed 50 users and distributors of El Paquete — which means “The Package” — to learn about the service and the way it fits into the lives of everyday Cubans.

“I focus on how El Paquete is transforming how people view themselves as consumers,” Calle said. “This is one of the first forms of consumer culture that is being normalized in Cuba, in part because it’s cheap and easy to pass around.”

You can read more about this story here.

 

November 15th, 2016
exotic state of matter photo

 

IN THE SUMMER OF 2015, Princeton students Joseph Scherrer and Adam Bowman experienced something few undergraduates can claim: they built, from scratch, a laser system capable of coaxing lithium atoms into a rare, highly excited state of matter to reveal their quantum nature.

When they joined Assistant Professor of Physics Waseem Bakr’s lab in the spring of 2014, Scherrer and Bowman had little experience in optics or quantum physics. Their task was to convince lithium atoms to enter a state of matter known as the Rydberg state. In this state, each atom has a very high-energy electron located far from the atom’s nucleus. The separation of the electron’s negative charge from the nucleus’ positive charge creates a dipole, like a magnet’s north and south poles.

To give the electrons the right amount of energy to create the Rydberg state, Scherrer and Bowman hit the atoms with two carefully tuned lasers, first blue and then red. To prove that the lithium atoms had indeed entered the Rydberg state, the two researchers needed a way to detect them. They trawled the scientific literature for a sensitive enough detection method, and eventually implemented a technique called electromagnetically induced transparency. With this technique, the Rydberg atoms interfere with the absorbance of certain wavelengths of light, so if the gas is transparent in those wavelengths, the Rydberg atoms are present.

You can read more about this story here.

November 8th, 2016
NCRC conference photo

 

On behalf of the Harvard College Undergraduate Research Association (HCURA) I would like to extend an invitation to undergraduate students at Princeton University to attend the National Collegiate Research Conference (NCRC) held at Harvard University on January 19-21, 2017. NCRC is a large-scale, multidisciplinary forum held annually at Harvard University, where the most accomplished undergraduate students from across the United States and internationally convene each year to share their research in the humanities, social sciences, and natural sciences. The core vision behind our conference is to provide student researchers with the opportunity to hear from the world’s leading authorities in academia, policy, and industry, as well as to foster important exchanges and dialogue between students. Last year, after being selected through a competitive application process, over 200 participants from nearly 75 universities across America and abroad attended our conference. Through NCRC, we hope to expand the perspective of undergraduate researchers through offering exposure to diverse fields and to facilitate the discourse on collaboration, leadership, and social impact in research that we believe will be invaluable in future pursuits. 

In the last five years, we have been honored to host speakers including Marcia K. McNutt (President of the National Academy of Sciences and former Editor-in-Chief of Science), Jeffrey D. Sachs (American economist and Director of the Earth Institute at Columbia), Steven Pinker (psychologist and popular science author), Robert S. Langer (chemical engineer, entrepreneur, and most cited engineer in history), and Stephen Wolfram (founder and CEO of Wolfram Research), as well as many other notable individuals in academia, policy, and industry. We are anticipating expanding the reach of NCRC to even greater heights for our upcoming 2017 conference.

I would appreciate if you could share this invitation (included below) with students who you believe will be interested in attending. The application deadline for general applications is November 28th, 2016 (11:59PM EST). You can find the application and further information our website http://ncrc.hcura.org/.  

November 8th, 2016
Allison Slater Tate

 

PAW Tracks

For this episode of PAW Tracks, we spoke with Allison Slater Tate, Class of 1996, who says that Princeton had an immediate grip on her imagination.

Allison Slater Tate ’96’s career has ranged from TV production to blogging about parenting, and her college experience has been useful at every turn. “In some ways, I’ve been way out of the Princeton track,” she says, “and in other ways, Princeton’s never left.”

PAW Tracks is also available on iTunes — click here to subscribe

November 2nd, 2016
Photo of Joanna Slusky

 

Joanna Slusky ‘01, an assistant professor at the University of Kansas, has been selected by the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation as one of five aspiring inventors to comprise the inaugural cohort of Moore Inventor Fellows. Her proposed invention is a protein that will re-sensitize bacteria to common antibiotics, thereby overcoming drug-resistant superbugs. The invention could have a global impact on antibiotic resistance and re-establish the efficacy of antibiotics.

She graduated magne cum laude from Princeton with a A. B. in chemistry and conducted undergraduate research in the laboratory of Robert J. Cava.

 Read more about this story here.

 

October 24th, 2016

 

For Princeton University faculty and students, the Mpala Research Centre, a multidisciplinary and multi-institutional field laboratory that sits on a 50,000-acre reserve and ranch in central Kenya, provides an expansive natural terrain ideal for large-scale field experiments in ecology, biology, geology and other fields. Princeton recently expanded its long involvement with Mpala by assuming the role of managing partner. Mpala offers students and scientists an international experience in a place of great natural beauty and diversity.

Read more on this story here.

October 24th, 2016
Office of sustainability Photo

 

This year marks the 10th anniversary of the founding of Princeton University's Office of Sustainability, the hub that supports, monitors and connects initiatives across campus focused on cultivating positive global and local impacts in the environment. The office's celebration for the University community is tomorrow afternoon. 

Read more on this story here.

 

 

 

October 14th, 2016

 

A new fund offered through Princeton University’s Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs will focus on cross-disciplinary projects involving quantitative data analysis.

A call for proposals is open to fund creative research projects, made possible by the Overdeck Family Foundation, which has donated $1 million to create the Overdeck Education Research Innovation Fund. This fund will be awarded over two years for innovative faculty and student research projects.

The funds will be distributed in the 2016-17 and 2017-18 academic years with two levels of grant support available: Grants of $5,000 or less, to be considered on a rolling basis; and grants between $5,000 and $200,000 to be considered annually.

You can read more on this story here:

October 4th, 2016
Music Theatre program photo

 

Now on the homepage:  In this Office of Communications team collaboration, Stacy Wolf, director of Princeton’s Program in Music Theater, and students reveal the many facets of the new program, including collaboration, close access to faculty and guest artists, and the process of creating new work — from musicals to opera to the avant-garde.

Watch the video and read the story here.

You can also watch the videos on our YouTube playlist here.

October 4th, 2016
Robotics image

 

In the course "Building Real Systems," known as Car Lab, Princeton juniors majoring in electrical engineering put their previous coursework into practice by building robotic projects.

Watch the video and read the story here.

You can also watch the video on You Tube here.

 

 

 

September 22nd, 2016
Spin Journalism seminar abroad photo

Photo by Iris Samuels, Class of 2019

This summer, six Princeton undergraduates embarked on Princeton's first journalism course abroad, in which students honed their on-the-ground reporting skills as they experienced firsthand the refugee crisis in Athens and on the island of Lesbos, Greece in the Ferris McGraw Seminar in Journalism "Reporting on the Front Lines of History — in Greece." This feature is Part 2 of a two-part series, "A Tale of Two Countries," focusing on new study abroad courses Princeton offered this summer. Part 1 introduces Princeton's first PIIRS (Princeton Institute for International and Regional Studies) Global Seminar in France, in which students immersed themselves in the rich tradition of French theater from the heart of Paris to the countryside of Avignon.  

Read more on this story on the Princeton homepage.

 

 

September 7th, 2016

 

For the past two years, the student organization Princeton Racing Electric has been designing and building an all-electric, high-performance vehicle to compete in the international Formula Hybrid competition. Watch their journey to qualify for the event in New Hampshire.

When Ben Sorkin put on his racing suit and helmet, he knew the moment he waited over two years for had finally come. His teammates helped strap him into the driver's seat. For the first time, he would be energizing their electric car for its very first run around a race track.

Sorkin, a mechanical and aerospace engineering major and rising senior, is a member of the student organization Princeton Racing Electric.

"The thing that drives the team toward success is the intersection between passion and sustainability," Sorkin said. "We are doing research and innovation for a sustainable energy future."

You can view the video on the homepage or see the video and short story here:

http://www.princeton.edu/main/news/archive/S47/19/76A12/index.xml?section=featured

The video is also available on the University YouTube Channel here:

https://youtu.be/mmYl608jPX4

 

 

 

 

September 7th, 2016

 

Princeton University's office of Sustainability would like to share an orientation video created for the first year students and all returning students about sustainability at Princeton. The video was made by Jared Flesher, award-winning director of Sourlands.

The mission of the Office of Sustainability is to cultivate the desire in all of us to lead meaningful lives in service of global human and environmental well-being.

You can find out more about the program on their website.

 

 

 

August 28th, 2016
Photo for Chemistry Dept Summer program

 

Determined to get summer research experience, Bufan Zhang, a rising senior at Vassar College, cold emailed chemistry faculty outside of her institution asking about open positions. One of the few replies came from Brad Carrow, an assistant professor of chemistry at Princeton University.

He encouraged her to apply to the department’s Summer Undergraduate Research Program for Diversity in Chemistry (SURP-DC). The nine-week program lets students from underrepresented groups at other undergraduate institutions conduct research full-time in a Princeton chemistry lab over the summer.

“The goal is to give the students an opportunity they wouldn’t have elsewhere,” said Susan VanderKam, a lecturer in the chemistry department and manager of diversity initiatives, who helms SURP-DC. The summer program is excellent due to the strength of the undergraduate research program that already exists for Princeton students, she said.

Read more about this story on the Department of Chemistry homepage.

August 21st, 2016
ISIP photo

 

University of Delhi undergraduate Unnati Akhouri loves physics. When she is not studying the mysteries of the particle world, she is drawing playful cartoons about the field (which she calls "phymics") featuring a superhero electron or photon in love.

So the opportunity to spend the summer working with faculty at Princeton University's Department of Physics was truly her dream come true.

"When I started researching summer internships in the United States I never thought I would end up at Princeton. Some of the top physicists have been here," said Akhouri, who recently returned to India for her final year at university.

Akhouri is one of 14 international undergraduates who spent this summer at Princeton as part of the International Student Internship Program (ISIP). The pilot program allows promising young scholars from institutions abroad to work with Princeton faculty and to experience the University's unique academic and research environment.

Read more about this story here News at Princeton.

August 9th, 2016
Kate Welsh's Photo

 

Singer Katie Welsh performed an evening of song, Women in the World of Sondheim,at Feinstein’s 54 Below in New York City on June 10, 2016, accompanied by pianist Emily Whitaker. She explored a dozen female characters from Sondheim’s musicals and how they informed one another when they were put “side by side” with one another and with some of the heroines from Golden Age musicals. Welsh’s event was an adaptation of a project originally directed by Suzanne Agins; it was previously developed at Princeton when Welsh was a student there.

Full story and Interview by Michael Hull can be found here https://www.everythingsondheim.org/katie-welshs-informative-cabaret-dozen-sondheim-women/.

August 5th, 2016

 

Princeton University is hosting more than 50 college students this summer who are participating in the Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) program. Funded by the National Science Foundation and supplemented by Princeton, the program engages a diverse set of science students from around the nation in original scientific research. 

At Princeton, students are working with faculty mentors in two academic units within the Princeton Institute for the Science and Technology of Materials (PRISM) — the Princeton Center for Complex Materials (PCCM) and Mid-InfraRed Technologies for Health and the Environment (MIRTHE). Also, an REU program in molecular biophysics spans the departments of chemistry, chemical and biological engineering, computer science, ecology and evolutionary biology, electrical engineering, molecular biology and physics.

Read more here on Princeton's Homepage:  

 

 

July 22nd, 2016
A new class created by the Council on Science and Technology at Princeton — "Transformations in Engineering and the Arts" — explores creative processes that are common to art and engineering. Students, including sophomore Jonathan Zong (above), demonstrated their final projects this spring during an open house at a new teaching space created for the course. Zong shows Michael Littman, a professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering, a robot he created to interpret and translate the movements of a dancer

 

Inspired by the desire to help broaden boundaries for vision-impaired people, three Princeton University students created an armband device that allows a wearer without the ability to see to interpret color. 

The project emerged from a new class offered for the first time this spring, "Transformations in Engineering and the Arts," and lived up to the name of the course. In addition to transforming the sensation of color from a visual to a tactile experience, the students transformed an idea born on a whiteboard into a product interweaving engineering concepts and artistic practices.

"Having a forum where our imagination is the limit has been an incredible experience," said Nora Bradley, a sophomore majoring in mechanical and aerospace engineering who worked with senior music major Noah Fishman and sophomore Sunny He of electrical engineering.

Read the full story here.

 

 

 

July 21st, 2016
Independent College Fund of New Jersey Logo

 

The Independent College Fund of New Jersey is seeking student applications to participate in the ICFNJ Undergraduate Research Symposium in March of 2017. Student participants will have new learning opportunities, develop presentation & communications skills, build peer networks, and engage with industry professionals. 

Application Process and Awards

ICFNJ will provide up to 28 awards (a maximum of $1,000 per project) according to the Participant Guidelines.  Participation in the Undergraduate Research Symposium is based on a competitive application process offered only to New Jersey independent college students as outlined in the eligibility criteria.
 
The Participant Guidelines and the application forms (pages 6-10) are available on the ICFNJ website.
 
To allow students an opportunity to conduct research through the Fall semester and Winter break, ICFNJ has established a deadline of September 9th 2016

Submissions

All completed submissions should be sent to:
 
            Independent College Fund of New Jersey
            Attn: Research Symposium Review Committee
            797 Springfield Avenue
            Summit, NJ  07901
            Tel.:  908/277-3424       Fax:  908/277-0851
            Email: luhrig@njcolleges.org

 

 

June 27th, 2016
The Princeton University campus is home to summer programs for students of all ages from across the country and the world. Princeton students, faculty and staff oversee programs designed to help elementary, secondary, college and graduate students build their academic and leadership skills. (Photo by Nick Barberio, Office of Communications)

Students of all ages from across the country and world will be engaged in a summer of learning on the Princeton University campus, taking part in programs on subjects ranging from chemistry and combustion energy to music and entrepreneurship.

Princeton students, faculty and staff, as well as leaders from other organizations, will oversee programs designed to help elementary, secondary, college and graduate students build their academic and leadership skills. The programs are part of a busy summer on campus. Princeton's Department of Athletics sponsors dozens of sports camps; Campus Recreation runs an annual summer day camp; and Conference and Events Services works with numerous outside organizations that use campus facilities for conferences and other activities.

The following list offers a look at some of the educational and leadership programs taking place this summer. Deadlines for registering for this year's programs have passed, but anyone interested in participating in future programs should consult the contacts listed below. Some programs are restricted to participants of certain ages, schools or other criteria. Reporters interested in covering any of the programs should contact Min Pullan in the Office of Communications at mpullan@princeton.edu or 609-258-9045.

Read the full story here.

 

June 27th, 2016
Summers at Princeton photo
University Services has launched a Summer at Princeton University website: www.princeton.edu/summer. The site hosts information on various campus support services, summer hours, and events on and around campus that may be useful for graduate and undergraduate students who are staying at Princeton this summer.

 

June 9th, 2016
Princeton seniors Lu Lu and Russell Archer in Colombia. Video still from Blake Hamilton, Office of Communications.

 

Last fall, two undergraduates in Sigrid Adriaenssens' lab in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering approached her about working together on their senior thesis project, from different angles.

Lu Lu, who is from Chongqing, China, wanted to work on sustainable construction with a focus on design and digital modeling. Russell Archer, who is from East Orange, New Jersey, wanted to physically test building materials. Adriaenssens served as the adviser for both students, who graduated in May.

With the help of a graduate student in Adriaenssens' lab, the seniors identified a partner, DAGMA (Departamento Administrativo de Gestión del Medio Ambiente, or the Administrative Department of Environmental Management), in Cali, Colombia. The students and the group collaborated on a project involving bamboo architecture and construction — the entrance canopy to a park to be used by schoolchildren.

Read the full story on News at Princeton.

May 31st, 2016
Katie Grabowski in Mozambique. Photo courtesy of Katie Grabowski.

 

The swimming pool at Chitengo Camp is a bright blue circle shaded by trees. It is a tranquil place to relax after a dusty game drive in Gorongosa National Park, but not long ago this inviting oasis was used by rebel forces as a prison.The pool, now ringed with deck chairs, instead of armed guards, is just one small sign of how far Mozambique’s prized park has come since a 15-year civil war broke out in 1977 and the country descended into chaos. “The park was cleaned out,” explained Kathryn Grabowski ’16, a civil and environmental engineering student at Princeton University. “Armed forces swept through the park killing anything they could eat or sell.”

But now, more than twenty years after peace was restored, the rich array of wildlife, which earned the park its nickname: “the place where Noah left his ark,” is on the rebound. It is that slow and complicated recovery process which brought Grabowski to the Park in the summer of 2015, funded by the Becky Colvin ’95 Memorial Award, to study an ecosystem on the rise. The award is presented annually by the Princeton Environmental Institute (PEI) and the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology in support of field research projects critical to the senior thesis.

Read the full story in the News Archive of the Princeton Environmental Institute.

May 26th, 2016
Connor Stonesifer in Panama. Photo courtesy of Connor Stonesifer.

 

When Connor Stonesifer ’16 first arrived in Panama in the summer of 2015, his Spanish consisted of saying “I want” and having to point at things. When he asked the woman who ran the hostel where he was staying to turn up the air conditioning, he received a cup of pudding instead.

“It was not exactly an auspicious start to my first foray into independent field research,” said Stonesifer, an ecology and evolutionary biology major at Princeton University, who had traveled to Panama to study nutrient acquisition strategies among different tree species in recovering tropical rainforests as part of his senior thesis.

Yet, having been told by his faculty adviser Lars Hedin, chair of the ecology and evolutionary biology department, that the senior thesis project is as much about creatively working through problems as any particular research question, Stonesifer ate his pudding and decided that his foreign language skills were an obstacle and not a barrier and focused his attention on what had brought him to Panama in the first place – trees. Specifically, why trees that spend enormous amounts of energy fixing nitrogen, actually grow faster than non-fixing trees that get nitrogen for free.

For six weeks in the summer of 2015, Stonesifer’s research laboratory was a forest: the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute’s (STRI) Agua Salud Project site near El Giral, Panama. The area is a rainforest recovery study site consisting of cleared and degraded land in various stages of recovery in the Panama Canal watershed.

Read the full story in the News Archive of the Princeton Environmental Institute.

May 20th, 2016
Tracy K. Smith and Alec Lowman '16. Image courtesy of the Offices of Annual Giving and Development Communications.

The senior thesis is helping Alec Lowman ’16 find a sense of himself in the world as an artist, says Professor Tracy K. Smith, Pulitzer Prize-winning poet and director of the Lewis Center for the Arts’ Program in Creative Writing—and it inspires her.

Professor Smith is thesis advisor to Alec, who is writing a book-length collection of poems about the idea of place. In the process, they learn from one another. She says, “You’re always stretching to get just past what is known so you can encounter something that feels like surprise.”

See the video story on Giving to Princeton.

 

May 19th, 2016
Sonya Hayden. Photo courtesy of Sonya Hayden.

 

Princeton University senior Sonya Hayden has been awarded a Witherspoon Scholarship to study theater at the University of Edinburgh in Scotland. Established last spring, the scholarship honors the historic ties between Princeton and Edinburgh, highlighting the role of John Witherspoon at both institutions, and is awarded annually to a Princeton senior. Hayden is expected to begin her studies at Edinburgh in September.

A native of Charlottesville, Virginia, Hayden is a music major who is also earning a certificate in theater. She said she will pursue her interest in playwriting at Edinburgh.

"[T]he opportunity to immerse myself in an international theater scene and learn about the similarities and differences between U.K. and U.S. theater is exciting," Hayden wrote in her application. "I … am confident that the structure of the Edinburgh program will allow me to find my artistic voice and discover engaging ways to tell the stories about which I am passionate."

After Edinburgh, Hayden plans to continue writing plays and musicals, composing music, and working in theater professionally.

Read the full story on News at Princeton.

May 17th, 2016
Campus as Lab.

What is Campus as Lab?

Princeton is a living laboratory filled with opportunities to study sustainability issues right here on campus through any discipline. By serving as a demonstration of sustainability problem solving, the University strives to ensure that all students can meaningfully employ the principles of sustainability in any future endeavor. For more information about the program, contact our Campus as Lab Fellow, Christian Rivera '14 and visit our website.

 

May 16th, 2016
A Humanities Sequence class. Image by Nick Barberio, Office of Communications.

 

2,500 years. 12 professors. One yearlong course. No smartphones.

Digging deep into ancient texts — the book kind — at a clip of 250+ pages a week your very first semester in college may sound daunting. But students in Princeton's yearlong humanities sequence for freshmen find that the unique structure of this supercourse creates a powerful bridge between past and present, illuminating pathways to help them become curious thinkers for life. 

"The humanities sequence is a yearlong introduction to the toolkit that you need to understand the building blocks of Western European tradition," said Denis Feeney, the Giger Professor of Latin, professor of classics and chair of the Council of the Humanities. "We begin with Homer in the first semester, and we end with Dante at the end of the first semester, and then we pick up at the beginning of the second semester with Petrarch and carry through to Virginia Woolf."

Students may enroll in one or both semesters of the humanities sequence, called the HUM sequence for short. Each semester — which counts as two courses — includes three 50-minute lectures and two 80-minute precepts a week. Students can also take additional courses to earn a certificate in humanistic studies. The Council of the Humanities also offers a yearlong, team-taught East Asian Humanities Sequence — an introduction to the literature, art, religion and philosophy of China, Japan and Korea from antiquity to the contemporary, including film and media.

The course is team-taught by professors from a variety of academic disciplines — ranging across literature, history, religion, music, philosophy, archaeology and art history — who each attend the lectures and lead their own precepts. This enables freshmen to get to know distinguished senior faculty beginning their very first semester at Princeton.

Read the full story on News at Princeton.

May 12th, 2016
A small shop in Havana. Photo by Dennisse Calle.

Dennisse Calle found the topic for her senior thesis along a Havana street, in the back of a stall that sells pirated movies and music.

May 10th, 2016
Réka Zempléni. Photo courtesy of the Princeton Environmental Institute.

 

The Princeton Environmental Institute hosted its 5th Annual Discovery Day on Thursday, May 4th. Discovery Day is a multidisciplinary poster session celebrating undergraduate senior thesis research on environmental issues. Sixty-five (65) students from 16 academic departments showcased their work, which was mentored by 47 faculty advisers.

Discovery Day is a culminating event for students participating in the Program in Environmental Studies and for students receiving research support from PEI. It is an opportunity for students to display and discuss their senior thesis research methodologies and results, to showcase environmental studies projects, to exchange perspectives, and to propose solutions to the world's most pressing environmental challenges. This year, the projects were categorized into several focal themes: climate and energy, energy technology and policy, oceans and the Arctic environment, water and health, biodiversity and land, urban sustainability, and culture and the environment.

Read the full story on the PEI website.

May 10th, 2016
Princeton undergraduates on a 2016 International Service trip to Ghana. Photo courtesy of the Pace Center for Civic Engagement.

 

Smoke billows from a tangled pile of burning wires as a young man pokes and turns the bundle to melt away the plastic outer coating and get at the copper interior. The ground quivers and shakes as he walks over layers of burnt wire, ash, and waste. 

Behind a camera, with microphone and notebook in hand, Kelly Zhou, a junior, Kelly Byrne, a senior, and Nana Kwabena Aboagye, a graduate student in the Department of Operations Research and Financial Engineering, take in the scene freehand – the ground too hot to set up a tripod – capturing the process of burning copper wire on video as part of the International Service Trip with the Pace Center for Civic Engagement. 

In January 2016, Zhou, Byrne, Aboagye and eight other Princeton undergraduate students traveled from New Jersey mid-blizzard to Ghana, Africa to spend one week working with the Agbogbloshie Makerspace Platform (AMP) to develop a series of informative videos to help AMP promote worker health and safety at the Agbogbloshie scrapyard. At Agbogbloshie an estimated 6,000-10,000 people work in the scrap trade dismantling and/or processing a wide array of items – such as batteries, household appliances, televisions, computers, mobile phones, vehicles, aircraft and telecommunications equipment – to forward on to steelworks, copper refineries and specialized recycling industries. 

Read the full story on the Pace Center website. Also see this Q&A about the video project with DK Osseo-Asare

May 9th, 2016
Kasturi Shah '16 and Vaasvi Goyal '16. Photo courtesy of the Office of Communications.

 

During their sophomore year, Princeton University students Kasturi Shah and Vaasvi Goyal decided to list all of the problems they wanted to fix in India, their home country. Once they realized that they shared a passion for education, they brainstormed ideas for how to expand access to education to children in India who may not have resources or support in school. Hello, Seekho was born.

Hello, Seekho provides free audio education through a toll-free number in India. By using a basic mobile phone, users can dial the number to connect to over 60 lessons teaching the English language at various levels of difficulty. "Seekho" means "to learn" in Hindi.

"When we decided to tackle education in India, we decided to focus on access and quality," said Shah, of Mumbai. "We thought of all the existing platforms for free, quality education like Coursera and then the wide-reaching impact of mobile phones in India."

Now seniors, Shah, a physics major pursuing certificates in Latin American studies and visual arts, and Goyal, an economics major from Delhi, have been wrestling with the question of whether to continue growing their social venture after Commencement or to pursue careers in fields related to their majors.

Read the full story on News at Princeton.

May 6th, 2016
Junior geosciences major Mitch Mitchell discusses his poster. Photo by Denise Applewhite, Office of Communications.

Frist Campus Center was the center of Princeton University's research universe Thursday afternoon as more than 150 undergraduates, graduate students and postdoctoral researchers presented their work at the first Princeton Research Day.

The event highlighted research from the natural sciences, engineering, social sciences, humanities and the arts in formats including talks, poster presentations, performances, art exhibitions and digital presentations — all designed with the general public in mind.

"It's a wonderful cross-section of the research enterprise at Princeton," said Pablo Debenedetti, dean for research, the Class of 1950 Professor in Engineering and Applied Science and professor of chemical and biological engineering.

Read the full story on News at Princeton.

May 5th, 2016
During their Skype discussion with Witte, students questioned him about European fears regarding migrants and terrorism, the increasing number of women and children who are joining the migrant flow, and the impact a changing political scene within Europe is having on the EU's ability to address the migrant crisis.

Every year citizens flee their homelands to escape political instability, violent conflicts, environmental degradation and grinding poverty. In 2015 alone, roughly 1 million migrants sought a more secure future within the European Union. Over the past few months, students in a Princeton University undergraduate policy task force have been studying the challenges EU leaders face in dealing with the migrant influx — and developing potential solutions.

The task force represents the most distinctive feature of the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs' undergraduate program and is different from a course, seminar or independent work in other departments. Task force work is often modeled on the way research is done by government staff. The group as a whole is charged with tacking a policy issue, and each student writes a research paper on one aspect of the larger problem. These individual papers satisfy the University's junior independent work requirement.

Read the full story here.

 

May 4th, 2016
Photo of a student performance

The first annual Princeton Research Day, a campus-wide celebration of student research, will be held on Thursday and features over 160 presenters who have been selected to give talks and show their independent creative and artistic works.

This event differs from other type of undergraduate or graduate research poster session because the event aims to give students the opportunity to explain their research in everyday language, rather than in specialist, technical terms. Undergraduate students, graduate students and postdoctoral researchers from all disciplines will be presenting at the event, from Chemical and Biological Engineering, to Anthropology and Sociology.

Read the full story here.

April 22nd, 2016
Joseph Scherrer    Photo courtesy of Joseph Scherrer

Princeton University senior and physics major Joseph Scherrer is one of 12 college seniors and first-year graduate students nationwide to be named 2016 Hertz Fellows by the Fannie and John Hertz Foundation. The fellows, who were selected from more than 800 applicants, will receive a stipend and full tuition support valued at $250,000 for up to five years of graduate study in the applied physical, biological and engineering sciences.

Scherrer, from Nashville, Tennessee, will begin pursuing a Ph.D. in physics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 2017 after spending a year in Germany as a Fulbright Fellow. Scherrer plans to pursue a research career in biophysics and explore biological systems by harnessing his academic backgrounds in physics and engineering, and his penchant for developing technological instruments.

Read the full story here.

 

April 21st, 2016
Daniel Teehan    Photo courtesy of Daniel Teehan

Princeton University juniors Briana Payton and Daniel Teehan have been awarded 2016 Truman Scholarships, which provide up to $30,000 toward graduate school and the opportunity to participate in professional development programs to prepare for careers in public service.

The award, which was given this year to 54 students among 775 candidates nationwide, "recognizes college juniors with exceptional leadership potential who are committed to careers in government, the nonprofit or advocacy sectors, education or elsewhere in the public service," according to the Truman Scholarship Foundation.

Read the full story here.

 

April 21st, 2016
Freshman Ryan Ozminkowski reports on his research into intellectual property rights.

Halfway around the table, it came time for freshman Ryan Ozminkowski to report on his research.

"The world is insanely complex," he said by way of introduction, before describing to his 13 Princeton classmates and professor how he was progressing with his study of intellectual property rights. 

"My goal," he said, "is still to make some kind of ideal copyright law. I'm going to come into class with a draft and get feedback."

Tackling complex topics and exploring solutions as a group is a key feature of "Capitalism, Utopia and Social Justice," the Freshman Seminar in Human Values being offered this semester. It is taught by Marc Fleurbaey, the Robert E. Kuenne Professor in Economics and Humanistic Studies and a professor of public affairs and the University Center for Human Values.

Read the full story here.

April 20th, 2016
  Photo of Lisa Gong by Noel Valero

As Princeton University senior Lisa Gong completed her internship at the Boston Health Care for the Homeless Program in the summer of 2015, she said goodbye to a patient she had come to know named Betsy.

Betsy asked if she would see Gong again. Hopefully, Gong replied.

Thanks to the Martin Dale Fellowship, Gong may have the opportunity to reconnect with Betsy as the ecology and evolutionary biology major travels the country for a year working in programs that provide health care to the homeless and capturing the lives of patients through documentary photography and video.

"The main goal of my project is to dispel unfair judgments against those experiencing homelessness and to elevate an awareness of the common ground we all share as humans existing together," Gong said. "I think everybody deserves the opportunity to be understood on his or her own terms. It's an overly idealistic sentiment, sure, but I hope that this project can at least somewhat help to project the voice of a population that typically goes unheard."

The fellowship, created by 1953 Princeton alumnus Martin Dale, provides a $33,000 grant for a senior to spend the year after graduation on "an independent project of extraordinary merit that will widen the recipient's experience of the world and significantly enhance the recipient's growth and intellectual development."

Read the full story here.

 

April 14th, 2016
Joani Etskovitz     Photo courtesy of Joani Etskovitz

Princeton junior Joani Etskovitz has been awarded a Beinecke Scholarship, which supports promising students in their graduate studies in the arts, humanities and social sciences.

Etskovitz, who is from Wayne, Pennsylvania, is an English major who is pursuing certificates in humanistic studies and European cultural studies. She plans to pursue a Ph.D. in English literature and a career in academia.

She is one of 20 students from around the country to be awarded 2016 Beinecke Scholarships, which provide each winner with $4,000 immediately prior to entering graduate school and an additional $30,000 while attending graduate school. The awards were established in 1971 and are administered by the Sperry Fund.

Read the full story here.

April 12th, 2016
Sara Fridovich-Keil    Photo courtesy of Sara Fridovich-Keil

Princeton sophomore Sara Fridovich-Keil and juniors Siddhartha Jayanti and Peter Park have been awarded Goldwater Scholarships, the premier award for outstanding undergraduates interested in careers in mathematics, the natural sciences and engineering. 

Fridovich-Keil, whose hometown is Decatur, Georgia, is an electrical engineering major. She hopes to pursue an academic career or one in industrial research and development. 

Jayanti is a computer science major from Hanover, New Hampshire. He plans to pursue an academic career. 

Park is a mathematics major from Seongnam-si, Korea, who plans to pursue an academic career. 

Read the full story here.

 

March 28th, 2016
In one EWB project, Will Guiracoche, now a junior, helped carry pipes up a mountain to install a system for delivering fresh water to the town of La Pitajaya in the summer of 2014.

When Josh Umansky-Castro joined Engineers Without Borders as a freshman, he traveled to the remote mountain town of La Pitajaya, Peru, to help build and maintain two water distribution systems serving 21 families. 

The pipe systems that carry water downhill from a distant spring were designed by Princetonians who came before him, and who left a lasting impact on the community they came to serve. 

Two years later, Umansky-Castro, a junior majoring in mechanical and aerospace engineering at Princeton University, is making his own mark. 

As one of two project managers for a new distribution system in Pusunchás, Peru, his team is building a system that will serve 120 families and provide over 6,300 gallons (24,000 liters) of running water per day. Each household is expected to have its own tap, a goal that local residents have strived for in the last 20 years.

Read the full story here.

March 9th, 2016
Microscopic image

Science Writing/Journalism Opportunity (Job #37869)
When: 03/07/2016 - 05/31/2016
Department: DFR-Ofc Dean for Research
·       Amount of hours will depend on student schedule and editorial schedule.
·       3 openings

Minimum Pay Rate: $11.50 per hour
Location: ON CAMPUS
Description:
The Office of the Dean for Research (DFR) has opportunities for a select group of undergraduate students to write science news and profile articles about Princeton University faculty and students for the Research at Princeton (http://www.princeton.edu/research/)  page and research news blog, Princeton Journal Watch (http://blogs.princeton.edu/research). These articles are aimed at a non-technical audience and conform to the news and profile styles used by major science magazines and web sites.
 
Responsibilities: DFR Student Writers will be required to familiarize themselves with the topic, interview faculty members and graduate students, write articles, rewrite in response to edits, and adhere to deadlines.
 
Qualifications: Successful applicants will have a strong interest in communicating about science and research to the general public, will demonstrate strong writing skills, and ideally will have familiarity with writing in the style used by web sites and magazines for science news.
 
Logistics: DFR Student writers may write on their own time from any location but must be available to check in with the editor during normal business hours at the DFR offices at 91 Prospect Ave. A desk is available for student use. The hours per article will vary, and the number of articles written will be decided by the student and supervisor.
 
Applicants should submit:
·       Resume
·       Cover letter explaining your interest in writing about science for the general public
·       One to three writing samples, with at least one being a news article of approximately 500 to 700 words.
 
Employer:
Catherine Zandonella
110 91 Prospect Ave.
Princeton, NJ 08544
(609) 258 0541
czandone@princeton.edu
 
Qualifications:
Excellent Writing Skills
 

March 9th, 2016
WWS news default

On Jan. 8, 2015, the “Intelligence and U.S. Foreign Policy” undergraduate Policy Task Force visited the Central Intelligence Agency Headquarters in Langley, Virginia, to present its research and policy recommendations. The task force was led by Keren Yarhi-Milo, assistant professor of politics and international affairs at Princeton University’s Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs.

The students met with Peter Clement, who worked with the CIA’s Directorate of Intelligence and served as briefer to Vice President Dick Cheney, as well as a panel of senior intelligence analysts working on issues related to arms control, terrorism, public and military relations, among others.

Read full article here.
February 19th, 2016
Emily de la Bruyere

 

Princeton University senior Emily de La Bruyère has been awarded the 2016 Michel David-Weill Scholarship to pursue a master's degree in international security at Sciences Po in Paris.

The scholarship is awarded each year to one American student from applicants at 30 top U.S. universities based on literacy and scholastic achievements, capacity for critical analysis, demonstrated history of leadership, and proven commitment to the community. 

De La Bruyère, who is from New York City, is majoring in the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs and pursuing a certificate in Chinese language and culture

Read the full story here.

 

February 18th, 2016
Campus as Lab

 

The Office of Sustainability is proud to present its new Campus as Lab logo! The logo symbolizes the interdisciplinary nature of sustainability challenges and the opportunity to address them through bridging operational and academic aspects of the university, with an ethic of service. These symbols are embedded within an iconic feature of the University, Nassau Hall, representing how sustainability problem solving here on Princeton’s campus can help us further achieve our goal of continuing to serve our nation and the world. The Office of Sustainability gratefully acknowledges Olivia Grah '19 for developing and designing the logo.

Princeton is a living laboratory filled with opportunities to study sustainability issues right here on campus through any discipline. By serving as a demonstration of sustainable systems, the University strives to ensure that all students can meaningfully employ the principles of sustainability in any future endeavor.

Learn more about the Campus as Lab Program here.

February 15th, 2016
The work of Princeton senior Katherine Ye, a computer science major, cuts across a swath of research areas, including different programming languages and cryptography. She aims to help bridge the gap between academia and industry in realizing the benefits of formal analysis when searching for mistakes in computer systems. Last December, Ye was named an Outstanding Undergraduate Researcher by the Computing Research Association. (Photo by Danielle Alio, Office of Communications)

 

Katherine Ye wants to bring more science to computer science.

Ye, a senior computer science major at Princeton University, is an advocate of formal methods, the process of using mathematical techniques to specify how software should function and to verify that it meets the specifications. In the computer science community, the use of formal methods in programming has been debated since the 1960s. They have not been widely adopted by software companies due to the perception that they require extensive training, add lengthy stages to practical software development, and are incompatible with certain software packages.

Yet the techniques, Ye says, can expose programming errors in software critical for banking, medicine, communications and voting, and could block hackers and thieves.

Read the full story here.

 

February 11th, 2016
Students in Princeton's Global Health Program pursue a wide range of opportunities, such as participating in a summer internship in the United States or abroad, taking health-related courses, finding support for health-related thesis research, and getting involved with on-campus activities related to global health. Above, Princeton students catch a ride at the Mpala Research Center in Laikipia County, Kenya. Global health certificate student Alex Wheatley (second from right) was part of an internship progra

Princeton's Global Health Program (GHP) serves as a hub for students interested in tackling some of the most pressing health-related issues of our time.  

Students can earn a certificate in global health and health policy and also pursue a wide range of opportunities, such as participating in a summer internship in the United States or abroad, taking health-related courses, finding support for health-related thesis research, and getting involved with on-campus activities related to global health. Students often decide to pursue a career in global health.

"Princeton students are part of a new global health generation — a generation that witnesses firsthand the severe health inequalities in the world and wants to do something about it," said João Biehl and Andrea Graham, co-directors of GHP, who introduce the program in the publication "Global Health at Princeton," which highlights GHP's offerings. "The Global Health Program equips students with the cutting-edge tools, real-life experiences and critical perspective to make meaningful change in a time plagued by both emerging and enduring health-related challenges."

Read the full story here.

 

February 10th, 2016
Andrew Nelson (Photo by Denise Applewhite, Office of Communications)

Princeton seniors James Agolia and Andrew Nelson have been named co-winners of the University's 2016 Moses Taylor Pyne Honor Prize, the highest general distinction conferred on an undergraduate.

They will be recognized at a luncheon during Alumni Day on campus Saturday, Feb. 20.

The Pyne Honor Prize, established in 1921, is awarded to the senior who has most clearly manifested excellent scholarship, strength of character and effective leadership. Previous recipients include the late Princeton President Emeritus Robert F. Goheen, former U.S. Sen. Paul Sarbanes and U.S. Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor.

Read the full story here.

February 1st, 2016
Unicorn sculpture by Kemy Lim ’15

Princeton students always anticipate the next thing, and this semester promises to be no different.  But I hope as you proceed through your courses, your independent work, and your other activities this spring, you’ll take just a moment to savor what you’re doing now.  Alumni surveys ten years after graduation tend to suggest that alums remember their thesis experience fondly.  Your thesis might not seem such a happy experience right now if you’re a senior working on a deadline but at some point, all that work will be tinged with nostalgia and the pride of completion.

But despite the stress of the moment, you can still try to savor the experience of research and writing, of collaboration in labs and studios, of chasing down creative ideas that might bear fruit.  Once this exercise is complete, when will you next have the time or the excellent mentorship with which to pursue such an ambitious independent project?

For those of you who are not yet seniors, I urge you toward a similar sense of present-ness, even as you make decisions about your future.  What moves you now in your studies?  Which courses excite your passions and ideas?  Which of your studies and co-curricular activities moves you and why?  Pay attention to the signals you get from your work (and from your play) and use them as information as you make your choices about concentrations and other ways to become involved on campus.

Read the full blog entry here.

January 28th, 2016
Logo for the Harvard Student Research Conference.

The Harvard Student Research Conference is the largest student run conference on education in the entire country. This year, it will be held at the Harvard Graduate School of Education on Friday, March 25th, 2016. All kinds of education research are accepted for the conference - qualitative and quantitative, work done through internships and class projects, completed and ongoing research.

The deadline to submit original research to the Harvard Student Research Conference has been extended. The new deadline for submission is Friday, February 12th, 2016. You can submit a proposal using our website: http://scholar.harvard.edu/src2016/proposal 

Please follow our Facebook page for more helpful submission tips and updates! 

https://www.facebook.com/events/1712240822367850/ 

January 28th, 2016
"House of Soul" — one the original "inside-out" houses in the Heidelberg Project — was one of the numerous houses set ablaze in a series of arsons in 2013. The loss of one of Guyton's crucial works was a tragic reminder of Guyton's persistent theme of change and time on the historic Heidelberg Street. The image above captures the reconstructed framework of the "House of Soul," and features Guyton's current project of placing painted clocks throughout the street. (Photo and caption by Alex Quetell, Class of

Imagine artists with a city as their canvas, their stage.

Princeton undergraduates in the course "The Arts of Urban Transition" have spent the past semester using texts and methods from history, theater and dance to examine artists and works of art as agents of change in New York City and Detroit.

"We're examining what it meant for industry to leave, what it meant for the economy, the built environment, the populations," said Aaron Shkuda, one of the course's instructors and the project manager of the Princeton-Mellon Initiative in Architecture, Urbanism and the Humanities. "We're considering why New York and Detroit have had such divergent histories since deindustrialization, how artists have shaped the process of development, and how they have responded to some of the contradictions of the postindustrial city."

Among the topics explored in the class: gentrification, relationships among artists, changing urban economies and the impact of urban arts initiatives.

Read the full story here.

January 27th, 2016
Logo of the Stanford Undergraduate Research Association.

The Stanford Undergraduate Research Association (SURA) is proud to announce that the application period for the Stanford Research Conference (SRC) has opened. This year’s conference is on April 15-17 in Stanford,CA and will be a national event, open to undergraduate applicants from across the country. Students from all major academic disciplines will have the opportunity to present their work and spend a weekend engaging with researchers from other colleges and universities. Applications are now open for submission and will be due on February 18, 2016 at 12:00 PM PST. Please visit our conference website, sura.stanford.edu/conference to learn more about the conference and find the link to the application. We invite you to learn more about SURA and what our vision is for the first national Stanford Research Conference in this letter from the SURA Co-Presidents. This moment has been months in the making and we are extremely excited to share it with you!​

 

APPLY NOW at: sura.stanford.edu/conference

Questions? Contact: board.sura@gmail.com

Visit the SRC Facebook page: facebook.com/StanfordResearchConference

Like SURA on Facebook: facebook.com/SURAcardinal

Learn about SURA: sura.stanford.edu

January 18th, 2016
Ella Cheng '16. Photo courtesy of Ella Cheng.

Princeton seniors Ella Cheng and Tyler Rudolph and alumni Lucas Briger, Anastasya Lloyd-Damnjanovic and Yung Yung (Rosy) Yang have been named inaugural Schwarzman Scholars. The Schwarzman Scholarship covers the cost of graduate study and living toward a one-year master's program at Tsinghua University in Beijing. 

For its first class, 111 scholars were selected from around the world. The scholars will study economics and business, international studies, and public policy. The courses will be taught in English by professors from Tsinghua as well as visiting scholars and will start in August. Cultural immersion and travel also are key elements of the scholarship. Blackstone co-founder Stephen Schwarzman founded the program and the scholars will be housed on the newly constructed Schwarzman College on the Tsinghua campus.

The full article on Princeton's Schwarzman Scholars is available on the University website.

January 18th, 2016
Members of the undergraduate policy task force posing in front of a statue of Nelson Mandela. Photo courtesy of Karl and Sally le Roux.

Six million child and 500,000 maternal deaths occur each year worldwide, often from easily-preventable causes. Why do women and children – especially those in developing countries – continue to die at such alarming rates?

This was the question posed to members of last fall’s undergraduate Policy Task Force, “Maternal and Child Health in Developing Countries,” offered by Princeton University’s Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs.

Every Task Force at the Wilson School challenges participants to address a specific public policy issue through both independent research and collaboration on joint recommendations the class presents to public officials, area specialists, or others in the public and private sector.

The full article is available on the website of the Woodrow Wilson School.

January 4th, 2016
Main building, RWTH Aachen University

The application period for the Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program (UROP) International at RWTH Aachen University has begun. The 10-week program takes place from May 23rd through July 29th, 2016. The program encompasses a two-week German language course and an eight-week research project at one of our university’s departments or affiliated research institutes. On top of that, students will participate in intercultural workshops, and leisure activities such as field trips will be offered, too.

There is no tuition fee associated with UROP International. Students will be required to pay a semester fee of ~230€ (~255 USD, ~350 CAD) for the public transportation ticket which is valid in the whole province (North Rhine-Westphalia). UROP International participants are offered a room in one of our student residences. Scholarships of 1,850€ (~2,040 USD, ~2,800 CAD) each are available to 30 students. The scholarships will be awarded based on academic performance and recommendation; students from our partner universities will be given priority.

As usual, students can apply to up to two projects using the “ONLINE-Form” registration through the database. The application deadline is January 31st, 2016. Generally, all undergraduate students from your university are eligible to participate in UROP International, provided that

  • they are US/Canadian citizens or permanent residents.
  • they are enrolled in an undergraduate degree program when applying.

Prior knowledge of the German language is not required; several levels of language classes will be offered.

In order to apply, students will first need to register to a project of their interest using our database. Subsequently, the following application documents need to be submitted via email to urop@rwth-aachen.de:

  • Application Form (can be downloaded from our website www.rwth-aachen.de/urop)
  • CV/Resume
  • Letter of Motivation (two separate letters specific to the respective project are required when applying for two projects)
  • Letter of Recommendation (may be sent via email or mail directly by the supervisor)
  • Transcript of Records

Please note that we only accept complete applications. Ideally, students submit their application as one single pdf file and include their name and the project number in the file name.  

 

Currently available research projects can be viewed using our database. The deadline for RWTH Aachen supervisors to post new research projects in our database passed last week; it is now up-to-date and can be accessed using the following link:

http://www.rwth-aachen.de/cms/root/Forschung/Forschen-an-der-RWTH/Angebote-fuer-Studierende/UROP/UROP-Projekt-Datenbank/~dwpq/Aktuell-verfuegbare-UROP-Projekte/lidx/1/?search=&aaaaaaaaaaaaaans=UROP+International&aaaaaaaaaaaaaant=&aaaaaaaaaaaaaanz=

 

For students who are keen on participating in UROP International 2016 but do not find a project in our database that meets their interest, we are happy to try to organize a placement with a research group directly. However, in order to do so before the application deadline passes, we need to know as soon as possible which research institute or group the student is interested in.

Applications can be submitted as of now.

 

See the enclosed flyer for additional information:

Flyer UROP International.pdf

December 16th, 2015
Sarah Cen    (Photo by Lisa Gong)

Two Princeton seniors with respective accomplishments in engineering and the arts have been named recipients of the Daniel M. Sachs Class of 1960 Graduating Scholarship, one of the highest awards given to undergraduates at the University.

Sarah Cen, a mechanical and aerospace engineering major, will pursue a master's in engineering science as a Sachs Scholar at Worcester College, the University of Oxford.

Ogemdi Ude, an English major, will spend a year as a Sachs Global Scholar studying Indigenous Australian physical theater in Melbourne, Australia.

The Sachs Scholarship is intended to enlarge each recipient's experience of the world by providing the opportunity to study, work or travel abroad after graduation. There are two types of awards. Recipients of the Sachs Scholarship study at Worcester College to pursue a specific Oxford degree program. Those awarded the Sachs Global Scholarship receive support for an independent project at an established institution abroad to "engage in a transformative intellectual experience."

Read the full story here.

December 2nd, 2015
Nicholas Barton    Photo courtesy of Nicholas Barton

Princeton University senior Nicholas Barton has been awarded a Rhodes Scholarship for graduate study at the University of Oxford.

Barton, awarded the scholarship in his native Bermuda, joins four Princetonians awarded 2016 U.S. Rhodes Scholarships last month. The prestigious fellowships fund two to three years of graduate study at Oxford. 

Barton, who is completing a bachelor's degree in astrophysical sciences, plans to pursue a master of science degree in mathematical modeling and scientific computing and an M.Sc. in applied statistics at Oxford.

Read the full story here.

 

December 1st, 2015
Amgen Scholars Program

The University of Tokyo (UTokyo) will provide hands-on laboratory experience to undergraduate students through the Amgen Scholars Program 2016. [This Program is made possible by Amgen Foundation as in 2015.]

The objective of the program is to provide undergraduate students from different countries (including some from Japan) who are committed to or who are considering a career in biology or related sciences and planning to continue to graduate studies, with eight weeks (from June 14 to August 10, 2016) of biomedical research experience in the basic and translational sciences. Opportunities for research experience will be provided by 32 research laboratories in 5 of the graduate schools and research institutes of UTokyo (Graduate School of Engineering, Graduate School of Science, Graduate School of Agricultural and Life Sciences, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences and the Institute of Industrial Science) where the students will be able to gain valuable hands-on experience in research.

Additionally, there will be opportunities for the students to take part in tours and guidance about the University, and other events organized to maximize their experience as Amgen Scholars at UTokyo. Each Amgen Scholar will receive a stipend to cover their return travel and living expenses, including accommodation, during the program.

 

UTokyo Amgen Scholars Program applicants must:

- Be undergraduate students enrolled in colleges or universities worldwide (including Japan) that award a bachelor¹s degree (or its equivalent)

- Be undergraduate students enrolled in four-year colleges or universities who are sophomores in their second year (with four quarters or three semesters of college experience), juniors in their third year, or non-graduating seniors in their fourth year (who are returning in the fall to complete their first undergraduate/bachelor¹s degree or its equivalent)*

- Have a strong record of academic performance

- Have a high level of English proficiency: as demonstrated by a minimum TOEFL (iBT) score of 79, IELTS overall band score of 6.0, if not a native English Speaker or if English is not your first language

- Have an interest in pursuing a Ph.D.

* Please note that undergraduate students enrolled in colleges or universities with a three-year bachelor degree program must have completed at least two semesters of their studies prior to participating in the Program.

The application for the program is now open online and will close at 3:00 PM on February 1, 2016 (Japan Standard Time).

To learn more about the UTokyo Amgen Scholars Program, please visit http://www.u-tokyo.ac.jp/en/prospective-students/amgen2016.html, and if you have any questions, please feel free to contact us by e-mail at amgenscholars@ml.adm.u-tokyo.ac.jp

December 1st, 2015
Students discussing at poster presentation

Applications are now being accepted for presenters at the inaugural Princeton Research Day, a campuswide celebration of the research and creative endeavors of the University's juniors, seniors, graduate students and postdoctoral researchers.

The May 5, 2016, event offers an opportunity for student and early-career researchers and artists to share their work with the community and will include contributions from the natural sciences, social sciences, engineering and humanities. The program will feature talks, posters, performances, art exhibitions, demonstrations, digital presentations and an awards ceremony for outstanding contributions. The event, to be held in Frist Campus Center, will be free and open to the public.

Read the full story here.

November 30th, 2015
Azza Cohen    Photo courtesy of Azza Cohen

Princeton University senior Azza Cohen has been named a George J. Mitchell Scholar to study culture and colonialism at the National University of Ireland (NUI) Galway. The Mitchell Scholarships were awarded to 12 students nationwide by the nonprofit U.S.-Ireland Alliance based in Washington, D.C.

A native of Highland Park, Illinois, Cohen is a history major pursuing certificates in urban studies and South Asian studies. Before freshman year, she spent nine months engaged in community service work in India through Princeton's Bridge Year Program.

Cohen said she will pursue interests in history and documentary filmmaking while studying at NUI Galway.

Read the full story here.

 

November 23rd, 2015
At the beginning of the exercise, attendees formulate their strategy for the day. (Photo credit: Katherine Elgin)

A group of Woodrow Wilson School students took part in a crisis simulation in which “senior officials” across the Asia-Pacific region confronted two significant challenges: a clash between China and the Philippines brewing in the South China Sea and the prospect of serious instability on the Korean peninsula.

The simulation, organized by Princeton’s Center for International Security Studies (CISS), was oriented around the interactions between the United States, China, the Philippines, Japan and the Republic of Korea.

More than 80 participants – including Princeton undergraduate and graduate students, West Point cadets, Naval Academy midshipmen and students from Rutgers University and the New Jersey Institute of Technology – played the roles of political and military officials from those five countries.

During the Oct. 18 event, participants had to negotiate diplomatic agreements, present public statements and work together to achieve varying political, military and diplomatic objectives. The simulation gave life to the myriad obstacles involved with crafting effective strategies in the real world. Adding to the realism, each student team was advised by a Princeton student or a visiting guest with real-world policy or military experience.

Read the full story here.
November 23rd, 2015
Duncan Hosie (Photo courtesy of Duncan Hosie)

Princeton seniors Audrey Berdahl-Baldwin, Duncan Hosie and Ryan Low have been named 2016 Marshall Scholars. The Marshall Scholarship covers the cost of graduate study and living at a British university of the recipient's choice for up to two years. Up to 40 scholars from American colleges are named annually.

Read the full story here.

November 22nd, 2015
Katherine Clifton photo

Princeton University alumna Katherine Clifton, a member of the Class of 2015, and seniors Richard Lu, Cameron Platt and Evan Soltas have been awarded Rhodes Scholarships for graduate study at the University of Oxford.

They are among the 32 American recipients of the prestigious fellowships, which fund two to three years of graduate study at Oxford.

Clifton, of Honolulu, concentrated in English and completed a certificate in theater at Princeton. A recipient of the Martin A. Dale Fellowship, Clifton is spending this academic year in Belgrade, Serbia, writing and staging an original documentary play exploring hostilities between Serb and Roma people. At Oxford, she plans to pursue a Master of Science degree in Russian and Eastern European studies and an M.Sc. in forced migration and refugee studies.

"I feel so grateful for this honor and excited to engage fully the unique opportunities it involves beneath the 'dreaming spires,'" Clifton said. "I'll be spending Thanksgiving with my family at home this year for the first time in six years, and I feel immensely lucky to have so many reasons to be thankful."

Read the full story here.

November 19th, 2015
Cover of Mapping Princeton

In Summer 2015, Jeffrey Gleason ’18 and Catherine Blume ’18 worked with Catherine Riihimaki (CST) to create Mapping Princeton. This multi-disciplinary project brought together computer science, geography, and graphic design to capture spatially the essence of Princeton University.

The atlas focuses on three aspects of the University: history, sustainability, and people. Princeton’s geographical growth as a campus is its spatial history; Princeton’s development as a sustainable campus is a spatial component of its environment; and Princeton’s graduates and alumni moving around the world is a spatial description of its people.

Read the full story here.

 

October 26th, 2015
NCRC logo

Princeton undergraduate researchers are invited to attend HCURA’s National Collegiate Research Conference (NCRC) held at Harvard University on January 21-23, 2016. NCRC is currently the United States’s largest student-run national research conference. Over the past few years, it has grown to include an audience of 200 top undergraduate researchers from the United States and a growing number of international universities presenting in a broad range of disciplines.

NCRC is an opportunity for undergraduate researchers to share their work at poster sessions and to deliver plenary speaker presentations while hearing from inspiring leaders in various fields of research. This year, we will be featuring notable keynote speakers including Rosina Bierbaum, member of the President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology Policy (PCAST) and former Acting Director of the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP); Jeffrey Friedman, Marilyn M. Simpson Professor at The Rockefeller University and discoverer of the hormone Leptin; Robert Lue, Professor of the Practice of Molecular and Cellular Biology and Director of the Bok Center for Teaching and Learning at Harvard University; and Alexander Kamb, Senior Vice President of Research at Amgen. Topics of research in the sciences, humanities, social sciences, and interdisciplinary fields are all encouraged.

The application deadline for general applications is November 1st, 2015 (11:59 PM EST). You can find the application as well as information about travel scholarships, housing, and registration on our website http://campus.hcura.org/ncrc/

Please feel free to contact christopherli@college.harvard.edu with any questions regarding this conference.

 

October 23rd, 2015
Jill Dolan

 Jill Dolan has inaugurated a new blog, Dean Dolan’s Downloads, where she will share occasional thoughts on matters of interest to the campus community. The blog is open to comments, especially to students who wish to share their feedback.

October 21st, 2015
Photo courtesy of Ryan Maguire, Office of Communications

ReMatch (link is external) is a research-mentoring program designed to connect undergraduate students and graduate students, two historically unconnected populations at Princeton, through their shared interest in academic research. ReMatch offers fellowship funding for mentorship connections and joint research projects. Two recent ReMatch Meet and Greet events were well-attended, with over 200 freshmen and sophomores participating, along with 45 graduate students. The graduate student mentors (link is external) come from the humanities, social sciences, natural sciences, and engineering, representing research opportunities of interest to a wide spectrum of undergraduates.

In November, two Meals for Mentoring dinners will be held, where undergrads will be given another opportunity to meet potential mentors and explore their research interest further. In December and January, the program will offer additional opportunities for students to find a grad mentor through small group meetups, lab tours, and research shadowing experiences. Mentor-mentee pairs will be invited to co-write a proposal to receive funding for a summer research internship in early February.

If you are a Princeton freshman or sophomore interested in this program, please contact the Office of Undergraduate Research at undergraduate.research@princeton.edu

The ReMatch program is a collaborative initiative of the Office of Undergraduate Research and the Office of the Dean of the Graduate School.

October 15th, 2015
Student presenters at symposium

As students mounted their posters and prepared their short films – the physical manifestations of a summer well-spent – the Woodrow Wilson School’s Robertson Hall lobby and Bernstein Gallery quickly became the stage for Princeton’s latest student research symposium.

Sponsored by the Center for Health and Wellbeing (CHW), the Sept. 18 symposium featured the work of students who conducted research projects and participated in summer internships sponsored by the global health and U.S. health policy programs. The event, which was held in partnership with campus organizations including International Internship Program (IIP), Princeton Internships in Civic Service (PICS), Princeton in Asia (PiA), the Community-Based Learning Initiative (CBLI) and the Keller Center, was open to students, faculty and invited guests.

“The CHW programs make it possible for any student to have a transformative experience in many places around the world,” said Kristina Graff, director of global health programs at CHW. “This experience shapes their understanding of global health.”

Read the full story here.
October 13th, 2015
Hannah Miller, right, has participated in several Keller Center programs including serving on the center's student advisory board and finding an internship with a startup company. Here she talks with fellow students at Keller's eLab Demo Day in 2014. (Photo by Victoria Sulewski/Photobuddy for the Office of Engineering Communications)

Ten years ago, the founding director of Princeton University's new center for engineering education set a simple goal: "To inject more engineering into the liberal arts and inject more of the liberal arts into engineering."

"We saw technology affecting nearly every aspect of public and private life and knew we needed to broaden engineering education far beyond its traditional borders," said H. Vincent Poor, now dean of the School of Engineering Applied Science. "Our vision was to teach technology more broadly in a societal context and also to engage with the community outside the University."

This purpose was reflected in the center's inaugural programs: the integrated Engineering, Mathematics and Physics course for incoming engineers, a set of cross-disciplinary courses including an entrepreneurship class, and the first annual Innovation Forum. Over the past 10 years, the Keller Center has continued these initiatives and expanded much further.

Read the full story here.

September 29th, 2015
Blanca Ramirez, 21, of Anaheim, a senior at Cal State Fullerton, and a first-generation college student, in Thomas' office on campus. Ramirez wants to improve the lives of women around the world through her sociological research. MARK RIGHTMIRE , STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Blanca Ramirez might be one of the busiest students you’ll find on the Cal State Fullerton campus. But still, she isn’t feeling overwhelmed.

“My grandfather is one of my biggest inspirations. He farmed by hand, without any tools until he was 92,” she said. “So, if he could work that hard all the time, I think I should be able to do so as well.”

Now 21 years old, Ramirez is on the cusp of a bright future. She’s a senior majoring in sociology and minoring in psychology. She’s a McNair Scholar. She’s done extensive sociological research at CSUF and Princeton University.

And she has one goal: to improve the lives of women around the world.

Read the full story here.

September 21st, 2015
Deborah Sandoval '16

Deborah Sandoval '16 spent the summer in 2015 at Yellowstone National Park and Montana State University as the Office of Sustainability's first Yellowstone Sustainability Software Development/Technical Intern. The Internship was funded by the High Meadows Foundation Fund. Learn more about her experiences through this Q&A: 

Describe your role as the Yellowstone Sustainability Software Development/Technical Intern?

My role as an intern was to design and implement an energy dashboard for an off-grid facility in Yellowstone National Park: the Lamar Buffalo Ranch. The dashboard allows users to view information about energy consumption on the ranch and how it relates to factors such as temperature, time of day, and time of year, etc. Additionally, the dashboard would give energy information about the solar arrays located on-site. I worked with staff from Yellowstone and Montana State University to complete the project. 

What was a typical day like for you?

I lived on MSU’s campus and walked to work every day at the HVAC lab in the engineering building. The lab was made up of mechanical and industrial graduate students. I was able to work in Yellowstone periodically, where I helped with hardware maintenance and worked on installing my software on-site.

Read the full article here.

September 16th, 2015
PEC logo

The Princeton Entrepreneurship Council (PEC) was established in July 2015 by President Eisgruber and Provost Lee, as the advisory and coordination body on entrepreneurship programs at Princeton University. PEC works closely with existing campus organizations to enable Entrepreneurship the Princeton Way.

To learn about opportunities for you to get involved in entrepreneurship at Princeton, please visit the new PEC website.

September 13th, 2015
Honored for their academic achievement, pictured with President Christopher L. Eisgruber (standing at center) and Dean of the College Jill Dolan (standing second from right), are, standing from left, Saisai Chen, Kevin Sun and Lydia Liu, and, seated from left, Kyle Berlin, Cameron Platt, Yuval Wigderson and Vladimir Feinberg. (Photo by Denise Applewhite, Office of Communications)

Princeton University celebrated the accomplishments of its students with the awarding of four undergraduate prizes at Opening Exercises on Sunday, Sept. 13.

"We're delighted by this year's prize winners, all of whom demonstrate the best of Princeton's students," Dean of the College Jill Dolan said. "They not only sustain high grade point averages, but their interests extend well beyond their declared academic paths, into international study, service work, arts practices, and a variety of engagements in campus recreation and community. We're very proud of their work and of their University citizenship."

Freshman First Honor Prize

This year's Freshman First Honor Prize is shared by Kyle Berlin and Kevin Sun. The prize is awarded each year to a sophomore in recognition of exceptional achievement during freshman year. 

Read the full story here.

 

September 11th, 2015
ICFNJ logo

 

The Independent College Fund of New Jersey is seeking student applications to participate in the ICFNJ Undergraduate Research Symposium in March of 2016. Student participants will have new learning opportunities, develop presentation & communications skills, build peer networks, and engage with industry professionals. 

Application Process and Awards

ICFNJ will provide up to 28 awards (a maximum of $1,000 per project) according to the Participant Guidelines.  Participation in the Undergraduate Research Symposium is based on a competitive application process offered only to New Jersey independent college students as outlined in the eligibility criteria.
 
The Participant Guidelines and the application forms are available on the ICFNJ website.
 
To allow students an opportunity to conduct research through the Fall semester, ICFNJ has established a deadline of September 25th

Submissions

All completed submissions should be sent to:
 
            Independent College Fund of New Jersey
            Attn: Research Symposium Review Committee
            797 Springfield Avenue
            Summit, NJ  07901
            Tel.:  908/277-3424       Fax:  908/277-0851
            Email: luhrig@njcolleges.org

September 10th, 2015
Princeton alumni Chris Murphy (left), Katherine Clifton and Jake Robertson, all members of the Class of 2015, take to the busy thoroughfare of the Royal Mile in Edinburgh, Scotland, for "flyering" — handing out flyers — as part of their internship with the musical comedy troupe Baby Wants Candy, in August. The interns also filmed performances, altered costumes and helped with light and sound effects. (Photo courtesy of Chris Murphy, Class of 2015)

During August, seven Princeton students and alumni experienced what it's like to be a part of one of the largest international theater festivals in the world — by serving as interns for the musical improvisation troupe Baby Wants Candy (BWC) at the Fringe Festival in Edinburgh.

The ensemble has a Princeton connection. In 2014, BWC's director Al Samuels and company members taught a Princeton Atelier on musical theater improvisation at the Lewis Center for the Arts. The Princeton Atelier, founded in 1994 by Nobel laureate Toni Morrison, the Robert F. Goheen Professor in the Humanities Emeritus, brings professional artists to the University for intensive collaborative work with students. Since BWC's Princeton course, the Lewis Center has promoted the company's Fringe Festival internship to its students. This summer, the Princetonians were among 30 interns from the United Kingdom and the United States. Below, four of them share highlights, surprises and lessons learned backstage, onstage and throughout the streets of Edinburgh.

Read the full story here.

 

September 8th, 2015
GHP logo

After a visit to Princeton University's Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Editor-in-Chief of The Lancet Richard Horton wrote that in Princeton, he found "a university not at all relaxed about its present or its future," but rather "an institution anxious to make an impact."

With its latest addition — a new, fully revamped online portal connecting all things global health — Princeton is showing just how much it aims to be, as Horton says, "a leading voice in global health affairs."

The Global Health Program website, developed by Kristina Graff, director of global health programs and associate director at Princeton's Center for Health and Wellbeing (CHW), gathers together information about students, faculty, Princeton partnerships abroad and global health-related events featured at the University.

"This website is a pathway for finding your global health community at Princeton," said Graff, who also is a Princeton alumna. "It provides snapshots of what faculty and students are doing across campus, and it offers a myriad of ways to take advantage of the program’s offerings."

Read the full story here.

 

August 26th, 2015
Photo of Ethan Campbell

 As the youngest member of the Winter 2015 cruise team, it is with both excitement and trepidation that I set sail onboard the S.A. Agulhas II. I am entering my fourth year as an undergraduate at Princeton University, where I have been studying in the Department of Geosciences with a focus on physical oceanography and climate. With recent Princeton graduate Preston Kemeny, I will be helping out with several projects onboard, including seawater sampling for nitrogen isotope analysis (a collaboration between Stellenbosch University, University of Cape Town, and Princeton) and trace metal analysis (which involves CSIR and SU). It is my hope that samples collected this winter will form the basis for my senior thesis next year. I want to acknowledge the support of the Princeton Environmental Institute, whose generous funding has enabled my participation in the cruise.

Read the full blog here.

August 5th, 2015
Students are admitted to JSI based on a demonstrated commitment to public service and multicultural social issues. - See more at: http://wws.princeton.edu/JSI2015#sthash.3bNdn7nP.dpuf
In mid-June, 29 rising college seniors cut their summer breaks short and set up shop at Princeton University’s Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs.
 
The undergraduates in this year’s Junior Summer Institute (JSI) class hailed from 24 U.S. colleges and universities, representing 16 states and 14 majors. The seven-week program prepares students for graduate study and careers in public policy and international affairs.
 
Students are admitted to JSI based on a demonstrated commitment to public service and multicultural social issues.
 
“This year’s JSI students are exceptionally motivated to bring about change and serve others in the domestic and international arenas,” said Director of Graduate Student Life Gilbert Collins, MPA ’99. “In light of the challenges facing our country and our world, their contributions are needed now more than ever.”
 
In addition to his work for the Wilson School’s graduate program, Collins manages the School’s JSI program, which he participated in himself as an undergraduate at Harvard University.
 
The fully-funded program, sponsored by the Wilson School for nearly 30 years, is part of the Public Policy and International Affairs Fellowship Program. Summer sessions are also hosted at Carnegie Mellon University, the University of California-Berkeley and the University of Michigan.
 
The curriculum encompasses microeconomics, statistics, writing, public speaking, organization and time management – all necessary skills for a policymaker’s toolkit. 

 

Read the full story here.

July 30th, 2015
Myesha Jamison, Class of 2018, says working on rural health care issues in South Africa this summer combines her interests in global medicine and public health.

This summer, Princeton undergraduate students are gaining new perspectives and opportunities through internships in a variety of fields in more than 50 countries through the University's International Internship Program (IIP).

IIP allows freshmen, sophomores and juniors to live and work abroad during the University's summer break. The program was established in 2000 with just seven student interns. Now, more than 200 participate.

"IIP's placements aim to provide undergraduates the opportunity to fully immerse themselves in a professional setting abroad that will allow them to explore possible career paths and to develop and expand their academic interests," said International Internship Program Director Luisa Duarte-Silva.

Read the full story here.

 

July 6th, 2015
Section of bridge featured in video

With a trip to Spain as a high point, Princeton University undergraduates participated in a semester-long study of Spanish bridge design in the class "A Social and Multi-dimensional Exploration of Structures."

Instructors for the course, offered last fall, were Maria Garlock, associate professor of civil and environmental engineering, and Ignacio Payá-Zaforteza, who was the William R. Kenan Jr. Visiting Professor for Distinguished Teaching of Civil and Environmental Engineering and the Keller Center during the last academic year.

Focusing on eight bridges and working in groups, the students learned about design and structure as well as economical, political, cultural, environmental and geographical context. They presented their work to the class during site visits to the bridges over fall break.

Read the full story here.

 

July 1st, 2015
Makenna May (Photo by Denise Applewhite, Office of Communications)

Editor's note: The following is a post to the Princeton admission blog site by Makenna May, Class of 2017, who is in Athens this summer on an internship offered through the University's International Internship Program. 

Being in Athens during Greece's financial meltdown has been an interesting experience. There has been a noticeable change in the city during this uncertain time for the country, and I wanted to provide a glimpse of what life has been like in Athens these past few weeks.

One of the first Greek words I learned was "endaxi" because, well, I hear it here more than I hear people saying "hello" or anything else. "Endaxi"—or just "daxi"—means essentially, "It's all okay, nothing to worry about." In Greece, any dispute or misunderstanding at a restaurant or store can generally be resolved with "daxi"—let's just not worry about it now. It's all fine.

Read the full story here.

June 22nd, 2015
Princeton ceiling

Students of all ages and teachers from New Jersey and beyond will be engaged in a summer of learning on the Princeton campus, taking part in outreach programs on subjects ranging from leadership and entrepreneurship to computer science, music and journalism.

Princeton students, faculty and staff will lead various programs designed to help elementary, secondary and college students build their academic skills and to provide cutting-edge lessons that teachers can take back to their own classrooms. The programs are part of a busy summer on campus. Princeton's Department of Athletics sponsors dozens of sports camps; the University runs a summer day camp; and the Office of Conference and Event Services works with numerous outside organizations that use campus facilities for educational programs and other activities.

The following list offers a look at some of the University's educational outreach programs taking place this summer. Deadlines for registering for this year's programs have passed, but anyone interested in participating in future programs should consult the links and contacts listed below; some programs are restricted to participants from particular schools, organizations or geographic areas. Reporters interested in covering any programs should contact Director of Media Relations and University Spokesperson Martin Mbugua in the Office of Communications at mmbugua@princeton.edu or 609-258-5733.

Read the full story here.

 

June 22nd, 2015
Earmon Foley

From studying the culture of war to creating a theater piece featuring aerial choreography, Eamon Foley's senior year at Princeton allowed him to experiment with and execute many of the ideas that had interested him for years. 

Foley earned an anthropology degree and a certificate in theater in spring 2015. Princeton students must write a senior thesis or conduct an independent research project for their major and certificates, and the creation of the thesis is considered a defining achievement in students' academic lives. For his theater thesis, Foley blended his academic studies with his professional experience as a performer to create an original theater-dance piece titled "Hero." The work was performed April 25-May 1 at the Lewis Center for the Arts' Matthews Acting Studio, the Program in Theater's black box theater. 

"In my time with the anthropology department, I spent a lot of time studying ethnography — the idea of gathering information through interview — and it kind of reminded me of 'The Laramie Project' [about the 1998 murder of University of Wyoming gay student Matthew Shepard] and all this great theater that's been created from ethnography," Foley said. "I thought this would be a great way to look at where anthropology and theater meet."

Read the full story and watch the video here.

 

June 11th, 2015
Ben Liu '15 with his poster

I attended the Practical Applications of NMR in Industry Conference in La Jolla, CA, which ran from February 9 through 12. My advisor, István Pelczer, told me about the conference and said that it would be a great opportunity to present my senior thesis research to a scientific audience that specialized in my field.

At the conference, I presented a poster on nitrogen-14 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Nuclei, like electrons, have spin and the premise of this type of spectroscopy is to measure how much energy it takes to flip a spin against a magnetic field. By measuring the energies of these transitions, a great deal of information can be obtained about what the nitrogen atom is bonded to, what functional group it is in, the concentration of the molecule it is in, as well as many other pieces of information that can be extremely useful in both academia and industrial applications. These applications include the detection and quantification of relevant molecules in biological systems like cancer cells and the resolution of complex mixtures.

Read the full story here.

May 20th, 2015
A student studying by the light of her solar lamp, provided by the Solar Library Program

Even in the sun-drenched islands of the Philippines, access to light can be scarce. Over 20 million people in the country lack access to electricity, including 1.5 million students at 8,000 unelectrified schools. In the dark, these children rely on the dim light of kerosene flames to read and complete homework assignments once the sun goes down; a study strategy that is dangerous both for their health and their homes. Exposure to the fumes from kerosene lamps can lead to detrimental health effects, and homes are regularly set ablaze by lanterns that have been knocked over.

Over the summer of 2014, I worked with Stiftung Solarenergie Philippines, an organization that seeks to fight poverty in the Philippines by providing all off-grid villages with sustainable access to solar energy. Stiftung also works with We Share Solar to provide solar suitcases to populations that lack power. Specifically, I worked on Stiftung’s Light for Education Program, which focuses on providing solar energy to rural schools. I was able to find this opportunity through Princeton’s International Internship Program and received funding through the Office of International Programs as well as the Class of 1995 Summer Service Fund.

Read the full story here.

 

May 18th, 2015
Professor John T. Groves and Tova Bergsten '15

How did you discover this research opportunity?

I was lucky enough to be offered an undergraduate placement in Professor Groves’s lab. After I studied abroad my Junior spring, Professor Groves welcomed me into the lab over the summer and for the coming year. I am happy to have called his lab home for my thesis work.

When and where was your research experience?

Through the summer of 2014 and throughout the 2014-15 school year I worked in the laboratory of Professor Groves at Princeton. Finding a thesis laboratory is a necessary part of the chemistry department at Princeton, but I am thankful for the opportunity to work with such talented researchers.

Read the full story here.

 

May 13th, 2015
Alex Adam ’07

The Lewis Center for the Arts announces the award of over $100,000 to support the summer projects and research of 43 Princeton students, including substantial individual awards through the Alex Adam ’07 Award, the Mallach Senior Thesis Fund, the Mellor Fund for Undergraduate Research, and the Berl Senior Thesis Award. The awards were made through a competitive application process that received 95 proposals requesting over $410,000 in funding. For many recipients the funding provides the resources to conduct research, complete training and pursue other opportunities critical to achieving their senior thesis project goals.

Three juniors, Maya Wahrman, Bri White, and Cameron Johanning, have been selected for the Alex Adam ’07 Award. Established in memory of Alexander Jay Adam ’07 and made possible by a generous gift from his family, the award provides $7,000 in support to each of three Princeton undergraduates who will spend a summer pursuing a project that will result in the creation of new artistic work. While a student at Princeton, Alex Adam pursued artistic interests in creative writing and theater. Joyce Carol Oates, his creative writing professor, praised his work as “sharp-edged, unexpectedly corrosive and very funny.” He was also an actor, and performed with the Princeton Shakespeare Company, Theatre Intime, and the Program in Theater.

Read the full story here.

 

May 11th, 2015
Denisa Buzatu

Princeton student Denisa Buzatu's vision for an environmentally sustainable building is a sort of shape-shifting origami façade. For her senior thesis, Buzatu, a civil engineering major, is designing and prototyping a structure that shades the façade of a building by folding and adapting its shape in response to sunlight. "It's like electrical origami," said Buzatu. While the overall shape of the structure is immensely flexible, the individual surfaces are rigid and can be composed of any material, such as acrylic or solar panels. 

May 11th, 2015
Denisa Buzatu, a civil and environmental engineering major, devoted her senior thesis to developing a moving façade to improve the energy efficiency of buildings. The structure, which she created as a small working model, adapts its shape in response to electrical signals allowing it to shade the building when most needed.     Photo by Denise Applewhite, Office of Communications

Princeton student Denisa Buzatu's vision for an environmentally sustainable building is a sort of shape-shifting origami façade. For her senior thesis, Buzatu, a civil and environmental engineering major, is designing and prototyping a structure that shades the façade of a building by folding and adapting its shape in response to sunlight.

Her design takes advantage of a type of wire that contracts when current is applied to it and yet "remembers" and returns to its original shape. These wires make up the edges of eight triangular faces, which are combined to form a seamless surface, and can be activated individually or in combination by a microcontroller to fold the surface in myriad ways.

"It's like electrical origami," said Buzatu. While the overall shape of the structure is immensely flexible, the individual surfaces are rigid and can be composed of any material, such as acrylic or solar panels. 

For example the surface could integrate solar panels as well as integrated sensors that monitor the amount of sunlight hitting the building. The modules could flatten automatically during sunny periods to simultaneously collect energy and shade the building, then use part of the collected energy to fold away when cloudy.

Read the full story here.

 

May 7th, 2015
Submission request for the Tortoise writing journal. Courtesy of Kelly Rafey, class of 2016.

Tortoise publishes excerpts from Princeton’s scholarly community who demonstrate excellence in writerly moves. We are soliciting writing from all disciplines – the humanities, social sciences, and natural sciences – at all levels and will publish the writing with reflective commentary on the writing process.

Submission Guidelines:

Email submission to wcjournal@princeton.edu.

Attach the full draft as a .doc file if possible.

Include a brief cover letter that:

  • States the author's name, netID, class year, and the course/project for which the paper was written.
  • Includes 1 - 2 paragraphs of reflection on the process of writing the piece, what is successful about it, and why.
  • Directs the editorial board to the specific page numbers on which exemplary writing moves can be found.

Questions can be directed to wcjournal@princeton.edu.

 

See our latest issues online. 

 

 

May 6th, 2015
Princeton student Rebecca Basaldua's senior thesis focuses on rape kits, which contain physical evidence collected from sexual assault victims and can play an important role in identifying and convicting rapists. The thesis, titled "Justice Untested, Crime Unsolved,” combines information on reports of rape in Colorado and use of sexual assault kits from 2009 to 2012 with information about law enforcement agencies, their budgets and the communities they serve.    Photo courtesy of Rebecca Basaldua '15

Princeton student Rebecca Basaldua's senior thesis relies on academic knowledge, research skill and a generous helping of tenacity.

The politics major's thesis focuses on rape kits, which contain physical evidence collected from sexual assault victims and can play an important role in identifying and convicting rapists. Sometimes, though, victims go through the invasive, hours-long procedure for the evidence to be collected only to see the kits remain untested for years.

Basaldua, who is from Edinburg, Texas, wanted to understand how often — and why — that happens.

When she found few answers in the limited academic research on the topic and scant data for her to analyze, she began to build her own sets of data. Basaldua looked first at a handful of states that require law enforcement agencies to report on untested rape kits, contacting government officials to provide data and answer questions. Eventually Colorado emerged as the state where the most useful information was available.

Read the full article here.

May 6th, 2015
Rebecca Basaldua

Princeton student Rebecca Basaldua's senior thesis relies on academic knowledge, research skill and a generous helping of tenacity. The politics major's thesis focuses on rape kits, which contain physical evidence collected from sexual assault victims and can play an important role in identifying and convicting rapists. Sometimes, though, victims go through the invasive, hours-long procedure for the evidence to be collected only to see the kits remain untested for years. Basaldua, who is from Edinburg, Texas, wanted to understand how often — and why — that happens.

April 27th, 2015
Princeton University senior Dayton Martindale, an astrophysical sciences major, took an unusual turn with his senior thesis by constructing a narrative that explores the trajectory, timetable and consequences of the eventual collision of Earth's home galaxy, the Milky Way, and the Andromeda Galaxy. His goal is to bring science before the public.    Photo by Denise Applewhite, Office of Communications

Since he was a child, Princeton University senior Dayton Martindale has loved science. So much so that after he receives his bachelor's degree in astrophysical sciences this year, he doesn't want to be a scientist.

He wants to be the person scientists need to help bring their research before the public. Martindale wants to help the average person understand the importance and influence of the work that occurs in the laboratories they'll never see, and that comes out of the fields they'll never study. He wants to be a science writer.

"What got me into science in the first place were Stephen Hawking books, and Neil deGrasse Tyson on television, and museum exhibits," said Martindale, who will begin the master's program in science and environmental journalism at the University of California-Berkeley in the fall. "I realized that if presenting science to the public is what I'm more excited about, why not do that?"

Read the full story here.

April 27th, 2015
Dayton Martindale

Dayton Martindale, a senior who receives his bachelor's degree in astrophysical sciences this year, doesn't want to be a scientist. He wants to be the person scientists need to help bring their research before the public. Martindale wants to help the average person understand the importance and influence of the work that occurs in the laboratories they'll never see, and that comes out of the fields they'll never study. He wants to be a science writer. "I realized that if presenting science to the public is what I'm more excited about, why not do that?"

Martindale will begin the master's program in science and environmental journalism at the University of California-Berkeley in the fall.

April 23rd, 2015
Douglas Bastidas

Nine Princeton undergraduates will intern and conduct research internationally this summer as the University's first Streicker Fellows. 

The Streicker International Fellows Fund was established in 2015 to provide undergraduate students with the opportunity to carry out substantive research or educational projects while immersed in a foreign culture. The fellows have designed their own projects or internships in conjunction with host organizations outside the United States. During their summer abroad, they will delve more deeply into their areas of study, expand their perspectives and improve their ability to speak another language.

The program, administered by the University's Office of International Programs, is made possible through a gift from John Streicker, a member of Princeton's Class of 1964 and chairman of the board of the New York City-based Sentinel Real Estate Corp., and his children: Margaret Streicker Porres, a member of the Class of 1997 and president of Newcastle Realty Services in New York; Michael Streicker, a member of the Class of 1999 and managing director of Sentinel Real Estate; and Elizabeth Streicker Albertini, a member of the Class of 2002 and a psychiatrist in New York.

Read the full story here.

April 20th, 2015
Hanna Kim

Natural catastrophes such as China’s magnitude -7.9 earthquake in 2008 and Japan’s magnitude -9.0 earthquake and subsequent tsunami in 2011, motivated Princeton student Hanna Kim's senior thesis, "When Disaster Strikes: A Comparative Study of Civil Society Response to Earthquakes in China and Japan." These events led her to travel to East Asia over winter break of 2014 to conduct field research. A major in the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Kim also is pursuing certificates in East Asian studies and translation and intercultural communication.

April 20th, 2015
The senior thesis of Princeton student Hanna Kim examines the civil society response to earthquakes in China and Japan over the last decade. Kim is a major in the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs who is interested in pursuing a career in U.S.-East Asia relations. (Photo by Denise Applewhite, Office of Communications)

In 2008, a magnitude-7.9 earthquake struck China's Sichuan province, leaving more than 87,000 people dead or missing, and millions homeless. Three years later, the magnitude-9.0 Tohoku earthquake hit Japan, causing a tsunami that covered more than 200 square miles, killing more than 18,000 people and causing a nuclear meltdown at the Fukushima power plant.

These natural catastrophes motivated Princeton student Hanna Kim's senior thesis, "When Disaster Strikes: A Comparative Study of Civil Society Response to Earthquakes in China and Japan," and led her to travel to East Asia over winter break of 2014 to conduct field research. A major in the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Kim also is pursuing certificates in East Asian studies and translation and intercultural communication.

Read the full story here.

April 17th, 2015
Jake Robertson (Photo by Denise Applewhite, Office of Communications)

Princeton senior Jake Robertson has been awarded a St. Andrew's Society Scholarship for postgraduate study at the Royal Conservatoire of Scotland. He will pursue a master's in classical and contemporary text (acting).

The scholarship, given by the St. Andrew's Society of the State of New York, provides $30,000 each for two Scottish graduate students to study in the United States and two American students of Scottish heritage to study in Scotland. The scholarship stipulates that American applicants have some Scottish background and intend to attend a Scottish university.

In his application, Robertson, who is from Lombard, Illinois, wrote: "My grandfather and I, both fascinated by our Scottish lineage, spent hours together researching our family history, and Scotland has become an indelible part of my identity. The program at RCS is as an opportunity to combine this ancestral connection with the pursuit of my theatrical ambitions."

Read the full story here.

 

April 16th, 2015
Thomas Gonzalez Roberts  (Photo courtesy of Thomas Gonzalez Roberts)

Princeton University junior Thomas Gonzalez Roberts has been awarded a 2015 Truman Scholarship, which provides up to $30,000 for graduate study.

The award, which was given to 58 students among 688 candidates nationwide, "recognizes college juniors with exceptional leadership potential who are committed to careers in government, the nonprofit or advocacy sectors, education or elsewhere in the public service," according to the Truman Scholarship Foundation.

Roberts, who is from Morris, Minnesota, is majoring in astrophysical sciences and plans to pursue a master's degree in public policy focused on international and global affairs. He hopes to work in the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy's (OSTP) National Security and International Affairs division. Roberts is interested in establishing standards for international agreements and peace related to space exploration. Roberts, who studies Russian at Princeton, envisions international research collaboration as a key to peaceful policies among the world's "space powers," particularly the United States, Russia, China and the European Union.

Read the full story here.

 

April 16th, 2015
Yuval Wigderson (Photo courtesy of Yuval Wigderson)

Princeton junior Yuval Wigderson has been awarded a Goldwater Scholarship, the premier award for outstanding undergraduates interested in careers in mathematics, the natural sciences and engineering. 

Wigderson, whose hometown is Princeton, is a mathematics major. He plans to earn a Ph.D. in mathematics and pursue an academic career. 

One- and two-year Goldwater Scholarships cover tuition, fees, room and board up to a maximum of $7,500 per year. Wigderson will receive the scholarship for his senior year and is among 260 scholarship winners selected from a field of 1,206 students nationwide. 

Read the full story here.

April 14th, 2015
Varshini Narayanan    (Photo courtesy of Varshini Narayanan)

Princeton junior Varshini Narayanan has been awarded a Beinecke Scholarship, which supports promising students in their graduate studies in the arts, humanities and social sciences.

Narayanan, who is from Scotch Plains, New Jersey, is an anthropology major and is pursuing certificates in Spanish language and culture and musical performance. She plans to pursue a Ph.D. in anthropology and a career in academia.

She is one of 20 students from around the country to be awarded 2015 Beinecke Scholarships, which provide each winner with $4,000 immediately prior to entering graduate school and an additional $30,000 while attending graduate school. The awards were established in 1971 and are administered by the Sperry Fund.

In her application for the scholarship, Narayanan wrote that her interest in anthropology was sparked in part by her experience as the daughter of Indian immigrants and a childhood "divided between a conventionally American school system and the vibrant community of the South Indian diaspora, complete with weekly religion classes, Carnatic music lessons and concerts, and the occasional Diwali celebration rife with illicit sparklers."

Read the full story here.

April 13th, 2015
Katherine Clifton    (Photo by Danielle Alio)

Princeton University senior Katherine Clifton was first inspired to write a play about hostility between the Serbs and Romani people while participating in Princeton's Bridge Year Program. Five years later, she will do just that as the 2015 winner of the Martin Dale Fellowship.

Clifton, an English major earning a certificate in theater, plans to spend a year in Serbia staging an original play that explores the perspectives of both groups and creates dialogue between them. As part of the Bridge Year Program, Clifton lived in Serbia for nine months doing community service work before her freshman year.

"With the Dale Fellowship, I will close my Princeton chapter by returning to where it began," Clifton said. "I hope to instigate dialogue between the Serbs and Romani people (known as the Roma) using theater as a tool to embrace our shared humanity and to challenge our prejudices. The Dale will allow me to delve more deeply into the perennial question of what unites and what divides us."

The fellowship, created by 1953 Princeton alumnus Martin Dale, provides a $33,000 grant for a senior to spend the year after graduation on "an independent project of extraordinary merit that will widen the recipient's experience of the world and significantly enhance the recipient's growth and intellectual development."

Read the full story here.

April 9th, 2015
Abidjan Walker

Senior Abidjan Walker pursued extensive international experience as an undergraduate. A comparative literature major from Hanover, New Hampshire, Walker has studied in China, Morocco, Switzerland and France. Building her linguistic and cultural toolkit sparked her senior thesis, which focuses on the language of instruction in educational systems in these countries. The advice she gives fellow Princeton students wondering about studying abroad, "I say, 'Go, just go.'"

April 9th, 2015
bidjan Walker's senior thesis explores educational systems from the standpoint of language in the three countries she studied in as a Princeton student: China, Morocco and Switzerland. Walker, a comparative literature major, said she is most proud of bringing together the languages she has studied for her thesis work.    Photo courtesy of Abidjan Walker, Class of 2015

"I say, 'Go, just go.'"

This is the advice senior Abidjan Walker gives fellow Princeton students wondering about studying abroad. Not only has Walker pursued extensive international experience as an undergraduate, she is using these travels as a launching pad for her latest journey  — writing her senior thesis. 

Walker, a comparative literature major from Hanover, New Hampshire, has studied in China, Morocco and Switzerland. Building her linguistic and cultural toolkit sparked her senior thesis, which focuses on the language of instruction in educational systems in these countries. Walker also has had an internship in France.

Read the full story here.

April 2nd, 2015
Princeton University senior Wendy Li, above, is writing her thesis in the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs while pursuing a certificate in visual arts. In this video, she talks exploring her family history through photography.    Video still from Danielle Alio, Office of Communications

Over a thousand black-and-white and color photos, spanning two walls and three generations, barely scratch the surface of senior Wendy Li's family history.

Li is pursuing a certificate in visual arts in the Lewis Center for the Arts, and her senior thesis show, "Self-Preservation," explored the role of photographs in discovering one's identity and creating memories.

Li collected photos and documents to tell her family's story, beginning with her grandparents in China and continuing with her parents' moves to Canada and the United States, for the show displayed on campus for a week in March. As visitors moved through her photo timeline, they could sense the progression of time as the same individuals were featured in most of the photographs.

"My thesis is sort of a play on the historical museum," said Li, of Chester Springs, Pennsylvania, who is majoring in the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs. "I'm thinking about how archives are displayed and how they are incorporated into history."

Read full story here.

April 2nd, 2015
Students in Engineering Without Borders-Princeton worked with a community in Kenya to design and build a rainwater catchment system, giving the village a source of clean, reliable water. (Video still by Jessica Luo, Class of 2015)

In 2012, Swahili lecturer Mahiri Mwita approached Princeton University's chapter of Engineers Without Borders (EWB) with the idea of starting a project in the Kuria District of Kenya where he grew up. Three years later, a team of Princeton engineering students has helped design and build an award-winning rainwater catchment system there to provide clean, reliable water, and the group plans to build another system this summer.

"After we finished our project and tested it, we had a small — it wasn't really small, it was a good three hours — meeting with the entire community," said sophomore Devansh Gupta, an electrical engineering major. "We gave them a tour of the entire project. … They were really appreciative of it."

Engineers Without Borders partners with communities in developing countries around the world and works on sustainable engineering solutions to meet local needs. The chapter, encouraged by Mwita's enthusiasm, decided to form a team to pursue a new project in Kenya.

Read full story here.

 

March 24th, 2015
Eric Falcon  (Photo courtesy of Sciences Po)

Princeton University senior Eric Falcon has been awarded the 2015 Michel David-Weill Scholarship to pursue a master's degree in European affairs at Sciences Po in Paris.

The scholarship is awarded each year to one American student from applicants at 20 top U.S. universities based on literary and scholastic achievements, capacity for critical analysis, demonstrated history of leadership, and proven commitment to the community.

Falcon, who is majoring in the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, said he is grateful for the $80,000 award, which will cover all tuition, living and traveling expenses during the two-year master's program at Sciences Po, a leading French university in human and social sciences.

"This experience will undoubtedly be an excellent starting point for what I hope to be a career serving on both sides of the Atlantic in the interest of improving and strengthening U.S.-European Union political, economic and strategic relations," Falcon said.

Read the full story here.

March 16th, 2015
s a Princeton student-athlete, junior Alex Wheatley is pursuing multiple passions, from playing for the country's No. 13-ranked women's basketball team to teaching in Kenya and studying public policy.    Video stills from Danielle Alio, Office of Communications

Sneakers skidded on a hardwood court and the rhythmic sound of a basketball hit the floor in different beats during a recent practice at Princeton's Jadwin Gymnasium. For Princeton junior Alex Wheatley, these sounds have been a part of her life since she was young. She remembers playing the sport in early elementary school and in her home driveway with her father. Now, Wheatley is a starting forward on the No. 13-ranked Princeton women's basketball team, which went 30-0 this regular season. The Division I team will learn its seed in the NCAA tournament on March 16.

"I love the sport, but I play for my teammates," Wheatley said. "The girls on this team are my best friends on campus. They're an amazing group of people, and I am honored and happy everyday to come play with them."

Wheatley's interests extend far beyond athletics. She is majoring in ecology and evolutionary biology and pursuing a certificate in global health and health policy. Last summer, Wheatley traveled to Kenya for eight weeks to work with the Northern Kenya Conservation Clubs as a teaching assistant to children in the fifth through eighth grade.

Read the full story here.

February 26th, 2015
Shah Kasturi, PEI intern

In the summer of 2014, 87 Princeton undergraduates affiliated with the Princeton Environmental Institute (PEI) held environmental assignments including positions with faculty-led research projects and as interns with NGOS, government, industry, and academic enterprises around the globe.

From their collective backgrounds in 17 academic disciplines, the 2014 summer interns addressed scientific, technical, policy, and human dimensions of global environmental problems.

Read summary descriptions of the 2014 PEI interns projects and experiences here.

February 25th, 2015
Photo by Lu Lu, Class of 2016

Princeton University students are showcasing their many opportunities to experience life abroad through "International Eye," an exhibition of photographs taken while participating in international study, internships, service and research.

The Office of International Programs, in collaboration with the Princeton Institute for International and Regional Studies (PIIRS), the Program in Russian, East European and Eurasian Studies, and the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures, sponsors the annual competition to select photos for the exhibition. A sampling of the photographs may be viewed in the video featured here.

February 24th, 2015
Cover of Unfound Vol.1

Unfound was created in the spring of 2014 by members of Princeton’s Asian American Students Association (AASA). The association’s Asian American Studies Committee has been working to develop an Asian American Studies program at Princeton and, in the process of doing so, saw the need to create a wider space for undergraduates in the US and abroad to contribute to the burgeoning field of Asian American and Asian Diaspora Studies.

The title Unfound refers to the ambiguities of the Asian American experience. “Unfound”, in its most basic sense, simply refers to something that remains elusive. But the word connotes deeper, emotional meaning upon reexamination. Unfound implies that there is something to be discovered. Unfound implies that someone has tried and tried again to find what she has been looking for, only to come up short. Caught between two identities, the Asian American seeks to carve out her own place in the greater American narrative. Asian American studies and Unfound seek to create a space where what has remained unfound can be discovered.

Read the first volume of Unfound: The Princeton Journal of Asian American Studies here.

February 13th, 2015
Samuel Kim. Photo courtesy of Samuel Kim

Princeton University seniors Laura Cooper, Samuel Kim and Cameron Langford have been awarded Gates Cambridge Scholarships. The awards give outstanding students from outside the United Kingdom the opportunity to pursue postgraduate study at the University of Cambridge. 

The recipients are among the 40 U.S. winners of the Gates Cambridge Scholarships. International winners will be announced this spring. A total of 95 scholarships will be awarded this year. 

Read the full story here.

February 12th, 2015
Yessica Martinez. Photo by Denise Applewhite, Office of Communications

Princeton seniors Yessica Martinez and Jake Robertson have been named co-winners of the University's 2015 Moses Taylor Pyne Honor Prize, the highest general distinction conferred on an undergraduate.

They will be recognized at a luncheon during Alumni Day on campus Saturday, Feb. 21.

The Pyne Honor Prize, established in 1921, is awarded to the senior who has most clearly manifested excellent scholarship, strength of character and effective leadership. Previous recipients include the late Princeton President Emeritus Robert F. Goheen, former U.S. Sen. Paul Sarbanes and U.S. Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor.

Read the full story here.

February 10th, 2015
Tortoise cover

Tortoise: A Journal of Writing Pedagogy is a semi-annual journal that publishes excerpts of student scholarship from within the Princeton community.

Read the first issue here and look for the second issue to be published in February / March 2015.

February 10th, 2015
Innovation 2015 journal cover

Innovation magazine is a student-run magazine dedicated to providing cutting-edge science news to the Princeton community.

Read the Winter 2015 issue here.

January 28th, 2015
Alex Wheatley

As a starter on Princeton’s 19th-ranked women’s basketball team and a student at one of the most prestigious universities in the world, Alex Wheatley’s life is pretty regimented. It has to be. Striking the right balance between student and athlete isn’t easy.

The junior begins most days an hour before her first class. During breaks, she’s often studying. From 4:45-7 p.m. Wheatley can typically be found at Jadwin Gymnasium, practicing with one of the nation’s two remaining undefeated teams. Around 8:30 p.m., after dinner, she’ll resume her studies before eventually retiring for the evening, sometimes as late as 1 a.m.

But Monday, Dec. 8, 2014 wasn’t a typical day. Sitting in Robertson Hall, Wheatley anxiously awaited her interview for the University’s Scholars in the Nation’s Service Initiative (SINSI). It was the culmination of a long application process that began in September. After months of writing essays and securing recommendations, it all came down to this.

Read full story and view feature video here.

January 26th, 2015
Princeton undergraduate presenting his research at a poster session

Share your work, learn from others!

Come to the Princeton Undergraduate Research and Public Service Symposium on Alumni Day, Saturday February 21, from 3 - 5 pm.

Work from all disciplines and service projects is encouraged!

Showcase your research and service projects (ongoing or completed) and get feedback.

Meet alumni interested in your work, make connections.

Give freshmen and sophomores insight into your major and the mysteries of independent work.

Win a Kindle or a meal at Prospect House.

For more information, contact Matthew Lazen, Director of Studies, Butler College at mlazen@princeton.edu

January 26th, 2015
Princeton University junior Colby Hyland is majoring in molecular biology and pursuing a certificate in dance. In this video, he talks about the relationship between his love of dance and how it relates to his academics.    Video still from Danielle Alio, Office of Communications

Princeton University junior Colby Hyland fell in love with dance when he was 8 years old. He was participating in gymnastics when a ballet class required for cross-training inspired him to pursue dance instead. Now, 12 years later, the Massachusetts native is majoring in molecular biology and pursuing a certificate in dance.

Dance is an outlet where Hyland says he feels most confident and in his element.

"Dance for me …[is] just this different type of expression during the day that you really can't get anywhere else," Hyland said. "Especially here at Princeton, I've found that it's such a great outlet to really release and just kind of explore ideas or emotions."

Read full story and view video feature profiling junior Colby Hyland here.

January 19th, 2015
One of Princeton University's U.S. Global Health Scholars
The Center for Health and Wellbeing (CHW) at Princeton University's Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs has selected three U.S. Health Policy Scholars and three Global Health Scholars. The scholars, all juniors, will receive financial support for travel and research to pursue internships and senior thesis research projects related to domestic and international health care and health policy.
 
Read full story here.
January 16th, 2015
Tiffany Richardson

Tiffany Richardson '17, a research assistant in the Soft Living Matter Group in the Department of Molecular Biology, presents a poster of her summer research at the Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology 2015 Annual Meeting.

See full video interview here.

January 13th, 2015
Photo of Nathan Eckstein
The Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs at Princeton University is pleased to announce its selection of the 2016 cohort of the Scholars in the Nation’s Service Initiative (SINSI). Established in 2006, SINSI is designed to encourage, support and prepare the nation’s top students to pursue careers in the U.S. federal government, in both international and domestic agencies. The goal of the highly competitive scholarship program is to provide the rigorous academic preparation, language skills and workplace skills needed to succeed and make a difference in the public policy arena.
 
“I’m delighted to extend congratulations to the five students selected as SINSI Scholars for 2016," said Cecilia Rouse, dean of the Wilson School. "They are an outstanding group of students with remarkable qualifications, and I am certain we will hear of their many achievements as they embark upon careers in public service."
 

See full story and list of the Class of 2016 Scholars here.

January 12th, 2015
Purcell Carson (right), the instructor of the class "Documentary Film and the City," helps Princeton University student Sharon Deng set up a camera during an interview at the YMCA of Trenton. Students are creating short doumentaries to tell stories of Trenton, New Jersey, its people and the ways they make a living. Photo by Denise Applewhite, Office of Communications

Kenya's story starts on a bus as she rides to her job at a recently opened Amazon distribution warehouse.

Juan's story starts at a small store on State Street, a permanent home for a business he started by selling dresses and women's shoes from the back of his car.

They are stories of Trenton, New Jersey, its people and the ways they make a living. Princeton undergraduates are telling these stories and others like them this semester through short documentaries as part of the course "Documentary Film and the City."

"If you want to live in the city, you have to have jobs in the city," said Purcell Carson, a filmmaker and a documentary production specialist at the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs who leads the class. "We're focusing this semester on employment, people who have jobs, people who need jobs, people who want to start their own businesses or have their own businesses."

Read the full story here.

January 7th, 2015
Event poster

Senior Jake Robertson will present a dramatic reading of "Madman/Robertson," an original adaptation of Nikolai Gogol's classic Russian short story "Diary of a Madman" but with a twist — exploring all the characters in the story as well as the art of performing itself — at 8 p.m. Thursday through Saturday, Jan. 8-10, in the Whitman College Theater. Additional performances will take place at 11 p.m. Friday, Jan. 9, and 2 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 10. The performances are free.

January 7th, 2015
Event poster

Seniors Pat Rounds and Blake Edwards will perform "The Basic Training of Pavlo Hummel" for their senior thesis project at 8 p.m. Thursday through Saturday, Jan. 8-10, in the Matthews Theater, 185 Nassau St. The play, written by David Rabe, tells the story of awkward young soldier Pavlo Hummel who trains for combat in Vietnam and achieves some distinction in battle before meeting a tragic end. For tickets, call University Ticketing at 609-258-9220.

January 7th, 2015
Event Poster

Rough cuts of short films from "The Trenton Project 2014: Work Makes a City Work" made by students in the Program in Urban Studies' fall course "Documentary Film and the City" will be screened at 7 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 8, in Dodds Auditorium, Robertson Hall.

December 11th, 2014
Photo courtesy of Brett Diehl

Two seniors with track records of achievement in academics and research have been named recipients of the Daniel M. Sachs Class of 1960 Graduating Scholarship, one of the highest awards given to Princeton undergraduates.

William Beacom, a concentrator in the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs who is pursuing a certificate in East Asian studies, has been awarded the Sachs Global Scholarship. He will spend a year in five Central Asian nations studying the impact of Chinese influence on authoritarian regimes.

Brett Diehl, a history major who is also pursuing certificates in Spanish language and culture and Latin American studies, will spend two years of graduate studies at the University of Oxford. Diehl intends to pursue a one-year MSc degree in economic and social history followed by a one-year MSc in criminology and criminal justice.

The Sachs awards are intended to enlarge each recipient's experience of the world by providing the opportunity to study, work or travel abroad after graduation. There are two types of awards. Recipients of the Sachs Scholarship study at Worcester College to pursue a specific Oxford degree program. The Sachs Global Scholarship supports an independent project at an established institution abroad to "engage in a transformative intellectual experience."

Read full story here.

December 9th, 2014
Alana Miller (left), a Princeton senior majoring in civil and environmental engineering, and Mary Kang, then a doctoral researcher in civil and environmental engineering at Princeton, conduct research that found abandoned oil and gas wells emit methane, a powerful greenhouse gas. Kang, now at Stanford University, is the lead author of a recent journal article describing the findings. (Photo courtesy of Robert Jackson, Stanford University)

Princeton University researchers have uncovered a previously unknown, and possibly substantial, source of the greenhouse gas methane to the Earth's atmosphere.

After testing a sample of abandoned oil and natural gas wells in northwestern Pennsylvania, the researchers found that many of the old wells leaked substantial quantities of methane. Because there are so many abandoned wells nationwide (a recent study from Stanford University concluded there were roughly 3 million abandoned wells in the United States) the researchers believe the overall contribution of leaking wells could be significant.

The researchers said their findings identify a need to make measurements across a wide variety of regions in Pennsylvania but also in other states with a long history of oil and gas development such as California and Texas.

"The research indicates that this is a source of methane that should not be ignored," said Michael Celia, the Theodore Shelton Pitney Professor of Environmental Studies and professor of civil and environmental engineering at Princeton. "We need to determine how significant it is on a wider basis."

Read full story here.

December 8th, 2014
Photo of Claire Gmachl. Video by Danielle Alio, Office of Communications

A non-invasive way to monitor blood sugar could help millions of diabetics check their condition without drawing blood. Princeton Professor Claire Gmachl is developing a technology to do just that, using a laser to measure blood sugar through the skin. It is one of many research projects at Princeton University that have the potential to benefit society.

The video below highlights three researchers who are striving to improve people's lives through innovations in science and engineering. Like most Princeton researchers, the three faculty members and their teams are strongly motivated to apply their discoveries to solving real-world problems.

Read full story and view video here.

November 24th, 2014
Photo of Rachel Skokowski by Denise Applewhite, Office of Communications

Princeton University alumnus Joseph Barrett, a member of the Class of 2014, and seniors Rachel Skokowski and Sarah Yerima have been awarded Rhodes Scholarships for graduate study at the University of Oxford.

They are among the 32 American recipients of the prestigious fellowships, which fund two to three years of graduate study at Oxford.

Read full story here.

November 20th, 2014
Cover of November 2014 Sustainability report
Princeton's sixth annual report on sustainability demonstrates continued progress toward ambitious goals through the University’s strengths in teaching, collaborative research and operational innovation.The University continues to expand the demonstration of principled pathways to sustainability leadership through rigorous inquiry and endeavors that use the campus as a living laboratory.
 
Access the full report here.
November 19th, 2014
Cover graphic for the story "A Risky Proposition"

RISK IS EVERYWHERE. There’s a risk, for example, that volcanic ash will damage aircraft engines. So when a volcano erupted in Iceland in April 2010, concerns about the plume of volcanic ash disrupted air travel across Europe for about a week. Travelers, from the Prince of Wales to Miley Cyrus, were forced to adjust their plans.

In the interconnected world of the 21st century, that risk also put Kenyan flower farm employees out of work because their crop couldn’t reach Europe, and forced Nissan to halt production of some models in Japan because certain parts weren’t available.

Welcome to global systemic risk, where virtually every person on Earth can be affected by disruption in interdependent systems as diverse as electricity transmission, computer networks, food and water supplies, transportation, health care, and finance. The risks are complicated and little understood.

A core group of about two dozen faculty members from across the University — along with postdoctoral research fellows, graduate students, undergraduates and outside researchers — has come together for a three-year research effort focused on developing a comprehensive and cohesive framework for the study of such risks.

Read full story here.

 

November 18th, 2014
For her senior research thesis, Oladoyin Phillips, Class of 2014, explored solutions to the electricity shortage in her home country, Nigeria. (Photo by Christopher Kwadwo Ampofo Gordon)

GROWING UP IN LAGOS, NIGERIA, Oladoyin Phillips was accustomed to the power outages that struck just as she was about to use her computer or charge her cellphone. “I was frustrated on those afternoons,” she said, “but I would remind myself that I was lucky because many Nigerians have no access whatsoever to electricity.” When it came time to select an independent research project for her senior thesis, required of all Princeton undergraduates, Phillips chose to examine solutions to Nigeria’s power problems.

Although home to vast stores of oil and natural gas, Nigeria delivers just 2 percent of the electricity typically needed to serve a nation of 168 million inhabitants. Over the last few years, the Nigerian government has privatized the power industry with the goal of improving its efficiency. But Phillips noticed that while Nigeria’s plan called for new power plants, it failed to address bottlenecks in the electricity supply chain. “I saw the opportunity to look at the entire system, from generation to transmission, and to develop strategies for improving the power sector,” she said.

Using skills she acquired while majoring in operations research and financial engineering, Philips analyzed large systems by gathering data and creating computer models. She focused on the natural gas-fired power plants that produce 80 percent of the country’s electricity (the remaining 20 percent is from hydroelectric power).

Read full story here.

 

November 14th, 2014
Alexander Iriza. Photo by Denise Applewhite

WHILE PRINCETON SENIOR Alexander Iriza, of Astoria, New York, credits his parents for sparking his interest in math — his mother gave him math workbooks when he was a toddler — that was merely “a nudge” in the right direction.

For his senior thesis, required of all Princeton undergraduates, Iriza worked with Yannis Kevrekidis, the Pomeroy and Betty Perry Smith Professor in Engineering, to examine specific data analysis techniques.

Read full story here.

November 11th, 2014
Photo montage of PEI interns from summer 2014

On Friday, October 3rd, eighty-five (85) Princeton undergraduates participated in the 7th Annual Summer of Learning symposium to share insights and outcomes from their summer 2014 internships and service experiences.

The Summer of Learning Symposium organized by the Princeton Environmental Institute (PEI) provides students the opportunity to present their research findings on scientific, technical, policy, and human dimensions of a wide-variety of global environmental challenges in energy and climate, sustainable development, and ecological health around the world.

In summer 2014, participating students travelled to destinations in the United States and 11 foreign nations on assignments with faculty-led research projects, academic institutions, NGOs, and government and community service enterprises.

“As interns, the students engaged in research, outreach, policy analysis, communications and other practical work experiences,” said Lars Hedin, chair of the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology and a member of PEI’s faculty. Hedin was one of six faculty who moderated sessions during the Symposium. “This internship program clearly enriches students’ perspectives and helps prepare them as leaders,” he said.

Read the full story here.

November 10th, 2014
Undergraduates on Streicker Bridge overlooking the Washington Road Stream restoration area listen as James Smith, the William and Edna Macaleer Professor of Engineering and Applied Science, talks about the research that is being conducted on the area. (Photo by Catherine Zandonella, Office of the Dean for Research)

The inspiration for a new research project came on a summer day when the humidity — a staple of summer in New Jersey — was so high that it was interfering with the results of Princeton professor Daniel Steingart's experiments. 

Steingart was testing a new electric-vehicle battery technology in two laboratories in the School of Engineering and Applied Science's complex when humidity got in the way. The problem sparked a project that would encourage his students to learn skills in setting up sensor networks while providing information to facilities managers that could lead to more efficient ways to control indoor climates.

The use of the "campus as a laboratory" has gained popularity at Princeton and institutions worldwide. Resembling self-contained towns, universities can be an ideal place to research topics in sustainability. The approach can be used to study a range of topics, from energy conservation to natural resource management, to the human relationship with the environment.

Read full story here.

November 5th, 2014
NCRC logo

Harvard's National Collegiate Research Conference has extended its deadline for poster presentations to:

November 9, 2014 (Priority)
November 15, 2014 (General)
Priority deadlines are given preference.

All humanities, social sciences, and natural sciences researchers are encouraged to apply!

The National Collegiate Research Conference is a platform for undergraduates from across the nation to share  their interest in research and discovery, to meet leading researchers and leaders in fields ranging from art and business to astrophysics and entrepreneurship. This year, NCRC will be featuring the following keynote speakers:

Marcia McNutt, Editor-in-Chief, Science Magazine
Robert Langer,  Founder of Tissue Engineering in Regenerative Medicine
Temple Grandin, Best selling author, world-renowned autism activist
Donald Pfister, Asa  Gray Professor of Systematic Botany, Harvard University

Participants will be able to attend workshops and panels across diverse disciplines and engage with each other to solve the century’s pressing problems in our Innovation Challenge. The conference culminates in a poster session where students will get a chance to share their work with each other and with faculty, graduate students, postdoctoral students, etc.

Dates: January 22nd-24th, 2014
Deadline: Extended to November 9th
Apply here

 

October 22nd, 2014
Senior thesis workshops are sources of “structure, solidarity, caffeine, pizza, and chocolate.” (Photo courtesy of Danielle Alio)

The senior thesis is iconic — a rite of passage that links today’s students to generations of Princetonians. Yet, like all great Princeton traditions, the thesis not only endures, it lives, grows, and changes. We recently took steps to enhance the thesis experience, spurred by practices of peer review that undergird the quality of American higher education.

In 2013-14, Princeton successfully completed our decennial reaccreditation effort through the Middle States Commission on Higher Education, an independent organization recognized by the federal government to assess institutions ranging from community colleges to research universities. Leading institutions sometimes regard accreditation as nothing more than a periodic burden — rather akin to undergoing an IRS audit. But, if approached constructively, reaccreditation offers an opportunity for peer review that reinforces a great university’s culture of continuous improvement.

Read the full story here.

October 15th, 2014
Photo collage related to research

Do you have a poster from a summer research experience or other program?  Want to share your research in a casual setting with freshmen and sophomores?  Apply to present at an undergraduate mini poster session at Rocky on November 5!  Just send an electronic copy of your poster, your name, and discipline to justinel@princeton.edu by Friday 10/17 for consideration.

This event, to be held on Wednesday November 5 at 5 pm in the Rocky Common Room, will showcase examples of research to students exploring majors in the sciences.

October 12th, 2014
Principia logo

Principia is the new math research journal for undergraduates offered by the Princeton University Mathematics Club to encourage students to learn about new mathematical research. Principia aims to provide young mathematicians and all those interested with a resource to exchange mathematical knowledge and ideas. The journal publishes articles and papers on current research at a level accessible to an interested undergraduate. Articles are not limited to research -- a variety of non-research pieces pertaining to mathematics are also published. Principia includes expository articles on interesting mathematical properties as well as some light-hearted articles.

Principia is accepting any articles or academic papers that could be featured in its first issue that is to be published in the spring of 2015. All submitted articles or papers will be peer-reviewed before publication. If you are interested in getting an article published or in joining the Principia team, be sure to visit the Principia website for more information.

October 7th, 2014
Tortoise cover

Tortoise: A Journal of Writing Pedagogy is a semiannual publication edited and published by Princeton Writing Center Fellows. It showcases both undergraduate and graduate student writing from across all disciplines of study. Tortoise advocates for reflective writing habits by accompanying student-author excerpts with editorial commentaries that together articulate the process by which the writing was created, as well as germane writing and pedagogical strategies.

Tortoise is now accepting submissions for its Fall 2014 issue on Life Sciences and Literature Writing.

Contact wcjournal@princeton.edu for submission criteria.

www.princeton.edu/writing

September 30th, 2014
Brianna Leahy ’15 interned with the Jabulani Rural Health Foundation and Zithulele Hospital in South Africa, an organization run by Karl le Roux, a former Wilson School visiting lecturer and CHW visiting scholar.

Eighty-six Princeton University students, including 13 students in the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, shared the findings of their research projects and summer internships during a recent symposium. The event was sponsored by the Wilson School’s Center for Health and Wellbeing (CHW). It allowed undergraduate and graduate students who conducted research projects and participated in summer internships through CHW’s global health and U.S. health policy programs to share the highlights of their experiences through poster, multimedia and panel presentations.

Read the full story here.

September 11th, 2014
Globe with ribbons

Ten members of Princeton's recently graduated Class of 2014, seven graduate students and five recent alumni have been awarded Fulbright grants to study or teach abroad for the 2014-15 academic year.

The 2014 graduates and the countries in which they will be studying and teaching are: Quinton Beck, Tajikistan; Maxim Botstein, Germany; Molly Gibson, Brazil; Sohee Khim, South Korea; Neelay Patil, Spain; Sara Rubin, Israel; Dina Sharon, Israel; Rebecca Smaha, Spain; Stanley Yuan, South Korea; and Evangelie Zachos, Germany.

Read the full story here.

August 21st, 2014
A new system developed by Princeton researchers uses a laser to allow diabetics to check their blood sugar without pricking their skin. Members of the research team included, from left, Sabbir Liakat, a graduate student in electrical engineering; Claire Gmachl, the Eugene Higgins Professor of Electrical Engineering; and Kevin Bors, who graduated in 2013 with a degree in electrical engineering. (Photos by Frank Wojciechowski)

Princeton University researchers have developed a way to use a laser to measure people's blood sugar, and, with more work to shrink the laser system to a portable size, the technique could allow diabetics to check their condition without pricking themselves to draw blood.

"We are working hard to turn engineering solutions into useful tools for people to use in their daily lives," said Claire Gmachl, the Eugene Higgins Professor of Electrical Engineering and the project's senior researcher. "With this work we hope to improve the lives of many diabetes sufferers who depend on frequent blood glucose monitoring."

In an article published June 23 in the journal Biomedical Optics Express, the researchers describe how they measured blood sugar by directing their specialized laser at a person's palm. The laser passes through the skin cells, without causing damage, and is partially absorbed by the sugar molecules in the patient's body. The researchers use the amount of absorption to measure the level of blood sugar.

Sabbir Liakat, the paper's lead author, said the team was pleasantly surprised at the accuracy of the method. Glucose monitors are required to produce a blood-sugar reading within 20 percent of the patient's actual level; even an early version of the system met that standard. The current version is 84 percent accurate, Liakat said.

[...]

Besides Liakat and Gmachl, researchers included Kevin Bors, Class of 2013, Laura Xu, Class of 2015, and Callie Woods, Class of 2014, who worked on the project as undergraduate students majoring in electrical engineering; and Jessica Doyle, a teacher at Hunterdon Regional Central High School.

Read the full story (link is external) here.

July 31st, 2014
Monica Greco '13

Princeton's Office of Fellowship Advising, within the Office of International Programs, advises undergraduates and graduate students on a variety of fellowships, scholarships, and grants. The Fulbright Grant, sponsored by the U.S. government, was established in 1946 to "enable the government of the United States to increase mutual understanding between the people of the United States and the people of other countries." Several recent grant recipients have shared their perspectives from experiences in Poland, the Middle East, China, and elsewhere.

Monica Greco '13 (pictured), is in Amman, Jordan, where she is studying Roman military history as a continuation of her senior thesis. She is also working with Syrian and Iraqi refugees as well as Jordanians living in extreme poverty.

 

July 28th, 2014
Princeton students

Princeton students fan out around the globe each summer for research, service, learning and adventure.

Students participate in summer study abroad programs and internships arranged through the University and independently. Others travel around the world to do research for their senior thesis or other projects. Many receive significant financial assistance through the University. By example, this story includes students whose experience has been funded by the Dale Fellowship and the International Internship Program, which are among many funding opportunities managed by the Office of the Dean of the College.

See the full story and video here.

July 22nd, 2014
Polymer sun and mercury  by Hyuncheol Jeong (graduate student), Craig B. Arnold (faculty), Rodney D. Priestley (faculty), Princeton 2014 Art of Science Competition

The "Art of Science 2014" exhibit in the Friend Center on the Princeton University campus showcases 44 images of artistic merit created during the course of scientific research. More than 250 images were submitted by undergraduates, graduate students, faculty, postdocs, staff and alumni representing over 25 departments. This year, for the first time in its seven-year history, the competition also includes video. Twelve videos were chosen from more than 50 submissions.

Read the full story here.

July 18th, 2014
Mastroianni speaks at Class Day 2014.

At Princeton, Adam Mastroianni ’14 explored every angle of his interests, from the witty to the wise.

He pursued his passion of writing and performing comedy for fun, as well as conducted academic research on humor with an eminent social psychologist. Along the way, he earned numerous awards—including a Rhodes Scholarship—made lots of people laugh, and helped other students adjust to college.

“Being here opened doors for me that I only dreamed of when I was in high school, and other things that I couldn’t even imagine, because I had no idea that they existed,” said Mastroianni, the first person in his family and from his hometown of Monroeville, Ohio (population 1,400), to attend an Ivy League school.

Read the full story here.

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